Physics in the News

Monday, June 16, 2014

Starwatch: A sister for the Sun?

These clues have been used by a team of astronomers led by the University of Texas to identify the Sun’s potential sibling. Still unnamed but known as HD 162826 or by a number of other catalog designations, it is plainly visible through binoculars high in our summer night sky.

via theguardian

Now, we eat? Not so fast, NASA space farmers say

NASA astronaut Steve Swanson harvests a crop of red romaine lettuce plants that were grown from seed in space.(Photo: NASA)

NASA astronaut Steve Swanson harvests a crop of red romaine lettuce plants that were grown from seed in space. (Credit: NASA)

via floridatoday

Create the ultimate world clock with a quantum link

Atomic clock (Image: NIST)

Atomic clock (Credit: NIST)

via newscientist

Delayed SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket fires up engines

A planned launch of a Falcon 9 rocket Sunday evening was delayed to allow time for more tests on one of Orbcomm Inc.’s satellites.(Photo: FOR FLORIDA TODAY)

A planned launch of a Falcon 9 rocket Sunday evening was delayed to allow time for more tests on one of Orbcomm Inc.’s satellites. (Credit: Space X)

via floridatoday

NASA Scientists Recreate Complex Chemistry of Titan’s Atmosphere

This image is a composite of several images taken during two separate Titan flybys in 2006. The large circular feature near the center of Titan’s disk may be the remnant of a very old impact basin. The mountain ranges to the southeast of the circular feature, and the long dark, linear feature to the northwest of the old impact scar may have resulted from tectonic activity on Titan caused by the energy released when the impact occurred. Image credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona.

This image is a composite of several images taken during two separate Titan flybys in 2006. The large circular feature near the center of Titan’s disk may be the remnant of a very old impact basin. The mountain ranges to the southeast of the circular feature, and the long dark, linear feature to the northwest of the old impact scar may have resulted from tectonic activity on Titan caused by the energy released when the impact occurred. (Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona)

via sci-news

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