Physics in the News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Weirdly wonky binary star system discovered

Artist’s impression of the discs around the young stars HK Tauri A and B (Credit: R. Hurt (NASA/JPL-Caltech/IPAC)

Artist’s impression of the discs around the young stars HK Tauri A and B (Credit: R. Hurt (NASA/JPL-Caltech/IPAC)

via discovery

NASA’s asteroid mission takes a beating

This Document is a Parody (Credit: Richard Binzel)

This Document is a Parody (Credit: Richard Binzel)

via chron

The tiniest propeller ever can sneak between cells

The nanoprop is able to easily pass between polymer chains, like those present in bodily fluids. (Credit:

The nanoprop is able to easily pass between polymer chains, like those present in bodily fluids. (Credit:

via gizmag

Incredible GIF shows early Earth being pummeled by asteroids

The GIF below shows the impacts the model suggests happened. They go forward in time from red to blue (4.5 billion years ago to 3.5 billion years ago). (Credit: Simone Marchi)

The GIF below shows the impacts the model suggests happened. They go forward in time from red to blue (4.5 billion years ago to 3.5 billion years ago). (Credit: Simone Marchi)

via businessinsider

Scientists have recreated the core of Jupiter on Earth

The GIF below shows the impacts the model suggests happened. They go forward in time from red to blue (4.5 billion years ago to 3.5 billion years ago). (Credit: Collins et al)

The GIF below shows the impacts the model suggests happened. They go forward in time from red to blue (4.5 billion years ago to 3.5 billion years ago). (Credit: Collins et al)

via businessinsider

50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet installed at Fermilab

The 50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet at rest inside the Fermilab building that will house the experiment. The magnet was moved into the new building on Wednesday, July 30, 2014. The magnet will allow scientists to precisely probe the properties of subatomic particles called muons. (Credit: Fermilab.)

The 50-foot-wide Muon g-2 electromagnet at rest inside the Fermilab building that will house the experiment. The magnet was moved into the new building on Wednesday, July 30, 2014. The magnet will allow scientists to precisely probe the properties of subatomic particles called muons. (Credit: Fermilab.)

via phys.org

The Gaia Satellite will map one billion of the Milky Way’s stars (VIDEO)

via motherboard

Scientists explain mystery of our ‘lemon Moon’

A new accurate map of the Moon has shown that it bulges slightly at one side and is flattened at the top and bottom - but how did it get this way? (Credit: NASA)

A new accurate map of the Moon has shown that it bulges slightly at one side and is flattened at the top and bottom – but how did it get this way? (Credit: NASA)

via independent

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