Physics in the News

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Defying physics, engineers prove a magnetic field for light

An illustration of the nonreciprocity of the dynamics of light propagating in the forward (a) and the backward (b) direction. (Credit: Nature Photonics)

An illustration of the nonreciprocity of the dynamics of light propagating in the forward (a) and the backward (b) direction. (Credit: Nature Photonics)

via phys.org

Big Bang mystery extends into nearby galaxy, puzzling cosmologists

New observations of the star cluster Messier 54, shown above, reveal that it is just as strangely deficient in lithium as our own galaxy, deepening a mystery about the element's big bang origins. (Credit: ESO)

New observations of the star cluster Messier 54, shown above, reveal that it is just as strangely deficient in lithium as our own galaxy, deepening a mystery about the element’s big bang origins. (Credit: ESO)

via nationalgeographic

The quasar main sequence

This graph shows the distribution of about 20,000 luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars in the two-dimensional space of broad line width versus FeII strength, color-coded by the strength of the narrow [OIII] line emission. The strong horizontal trend is the main sequence of quasars driven by the efficiency of the black hole accretion, while the vertical spread of broad line width is largely due to our viewing angle to the inner region of the quasar. (Credit: Y. Shen, L. Ho, KIAA)

This graph shows the distribution of about 20,000 luminous Sloan Digital Sky Survey quasars in the two-dimensional space of broad line width versus FeII strength, color-coded by the strength of the narrow [OIII] line emission. The strong horizontal trend is the main sequence of quasars driven by the efficiency of the black hole accretion, while the vertical spread of broad line width is largely due to our viewing angle to the inner region of the quasar. (Credit: Y. Shen, L. Ho, KIAA)

via skyandtelescope

Looming crisis in physics, answer could be in other dimensions

via theepochtimes

Researcher probes nature’s building blocks in novel ways

To see something new, inventor, Raffi Budakian, had to get small — really small. The instrument he uses is as long as a human hair is wide and has the circumference of a virus.(Credit: The Budakian Group)

To see something new, inventor, Raffi Budakian, had to get small — really small. The instrument he uses is as long as a human hair is wide and has the circumference of a virus.(Credit: The Budakian Group)

via perimeterinstitute

Sun erupts with powerful Earth aimed solar flare

via discovery

Ultra-thin detector captures unprecedented range of light

“Graphene photothermoelectric detector device fabrication and principle of operation.” (Credit: Nature.com)

“Using a new operating principle called the “hot-electron photothermoelectric effect,” the research team created a device that is “as sensitive as any existing room temperature detector in the terahertz range and more than a million times faster,” says Michael Fuhrer, professor of physics at UMD and Monash University. The above image is a Graphene photothermoelectric detector device fabrication and principle of operation.” (Credit: Nature.com)

via spacedaily

Jellyfish flames on the ISS

via spacefellowship

A Lurking Companion Star Explains Enigmatic Supernova

The above sequence depicts a rare supernova explosion. Hubble images (bottom panel) correspond to an artist’s conception (top panel). (Credit: Kavli IPMU / NASA / Gastón Folatelli)

The above sequence depicts a rare supernova explosion. Hubble images (bottom panel) correspond to an artist’s conception (top panel). (Credit: Kavli IPMU / NASA / Gastón Folatelli)

via universetoday

Faster computers, electronic devices possible after scientists create large-area graphene on copper

this is a one centimeter by one centimeter graphene film transfer to a silicon wafer with a silicon dioxide top layer. (Credit: Xuesong Li and Weiwei Cai)

This is a one centimeter by one centimeter graphene film transfer to a silicon wafer with a silicon dioxide top layer. (Credit: Xuesong Li and Weiwei Cai)

via esciencenews

Humanoid robot, Nao, learns to drive its own car

via spectrum

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