Physics in the News

Monday, October 6, 2014

Princeton scientists observe elusive particle that behaves both like Matter and Antimatter discovered

via princeton

Turn your smart phone into a cosmic ray telescope

Professor Justin Vandenbroucke leads the development of the DECO app. (Credit: Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)

Professor Justin Vandenbroucke leads the development of the DECO app. (Credit: Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)

via wisc.edu

Physicists succeed in compressing quantum data for the first time

if we have a system of qubits all in the same state (with the same probability distributions), we have identical qubits, even though we might get different results upon measuring the individual qubits. Strangely enough, particles in the quantum world can be both identical and distinct at the same time.  (Credit: M. Byrne)

if we have a system of qubits all in the same state (with the same probability distributions), we have identical qubits, even though we might get different results upon measuring the individual qubits. Strangely enough, particles in the quantum world can be both identical and distinct at the same time. (Credit: M. Byrne)

via motherboard

Composite image shows two black holes orbiting each other

his composite X-ray/radio image of Abell 400 shows radio jets (pink), immersed in a vast cloud of multimillion degree X-ray emitting gas (blue) that pervades the cluster. The jets emanate from the vicinity of two supermassive black holes (bright spots in the image) in the galaxy. Chandra and radio data confirm that the unusual structure is due to the merger of two large galaxies, whose supermassive black holes are bound together by their mutual gravity. The swept-back appearance of the radio jets is produced by the rapid motion of the galaxy through the hot gas of the cluster, in much the same way that a motorcyclist's scarf is swept back while speeding down the road.Credit: X-Ray: NASA/CXC/D. Hudson, T.Reiprich et al. (AIfA); Radio: NRAO/VLA/ NRL

This composite X-ray/radio image of Abell 400 shows radio jets (pink), immersed in a vast cloud of multimillion degree X-ray emitting gas (blue) that pervades the cluster. The jets emanate from the vicinity of two supermassive black holes (bright spots in the image) in the galaxy. Chandra and radio data confirm that the unusual structure is due to the merger of two large galaxies, whose supermassive black holes are bound together by their mutual gravity. (Credit: X-Ray: NASA/CXC/D. Hudson, T.Reiprich et al. (AIfA); Radio: NRAO/VLA/ NRL)

via phys

NASA to put astronauts in deep sleep (therapeutic torpor) for Mars mission

via discovery

Jet activity at the neck of the Rosetta comet

rosettacomet

a region of jet activity can be seen at the neck of the comet. These jets, originating from several discrete locations, are a product of ices sublimating and gases escaping from inside the nucleus. (Credit: ESA, NASA)

via phys.org

Pluto the “Unexplored Planet” Is it a Planet? Could it have astrobiological potential?

via dailygalaxy

Rat brains enlisted in quest for spatial certainty

Researcher will mash together the visual recognition skills of humans and the spatial memory system of rats to enable robots to navigate in any environmental conditions. (Credit: The Australian)

Researcher will mash together the visual recognition skills of humans and the spatial memory system of rats to enable robots to navigate in any environmental conditions. (Credit: The Australian)

via theaustralian

Tiny fossil galaxies of first stars of the Universe found orbiting Milky Way

The image above shows a standard prediction for the dark matter distribution within about 1 million light years of the Milky Way galaxy, which is expected to be swarming with thousands of small dark matter clumps called `halos'. (Credit: Garrison, Kimmel, Bullock, UCI)

The image above shows a standard prediction for the dark matter distribution within about 1 million light years of the Milky Way galaxy, which is expected to be swarming with thousands of small dark matter clumps called `halos’. (Credit: Garrison, Kimmel, Bullock, UCI)

via dailygalaxy

Is the next supercollider a good investment?

cern-030308

There is no doubt in my mind that society invests its billions well if it invests in theoretical physics. Whether that investment should go into particle colliders though is a different question. I don’t have a good answer to that, and I don’t see that the question is seriously being discussed. (Credit: Hossenfelder)

via backreaction

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