Physics in the News

Sunday, June 22, 2014

Scientists Have Simulated Time Travel With Photons

Space-time structure exhibiting closed paths in space (horizontal) and time (vertical). A quantum particle travels through a wormhole back in time and returns to the same location in space and time. Credit: Martin Ringbauer
Space-time structure exhibiting closed paths in space (horizontal) and time (vertical). A quantum particle travels through a wormhole back in time and returns to the same location in space and time. Credit: Martin Ringbauer

via topinfopost

 

Stars’ Chemistry Key to Their Planets’ Ability to Support Life

Artist's conception of a protoplanetary disc. Credit: University of Copenhagen/Lars Buchhave
Artist’s conception of a protoplanetary disc. (Credit: University of Copenhagen/Lars Buchhave)

via space.com

 

Nobel Lecture Series: Data, Computation and the Fate of the Universe

via insidehpc

 

OPALS – A Laser Message From Space

At left: Illustration showing the 2.5 watt OPALS laser beaming video to Earth. At right, the laser beam arrives from the ISS as seen on the computer monitor at Table Mountain Observatory. (Credit: NASA)
At left: Illustration showing the 2.5 watt OPALS laser beaming video to Earth. At right, the laser beam arrives from the ISS as seen on the computer monitor at Table Mountain Observatory. (Credit: NASA)

via .redorbit

 

Is it Written in the Maths?

M.C. Escher works © Cordon Art-Baarn-the Netherlands.
M.C. Escher works © Cordon Art-Baarn-the Netherlands.

via maths.org

 

Swarm mission makes magnetic maps

A field snapshot in June. Reds are strong; blues are weak. The view is dominated by the core contribution
A field snapshot in June. Reds are strong; blues are weak. The view is dominated by the core contribution

via bbc.com

Physics in the News

Friday, June 20, 2014

Classic space science: UD physicist’s findings about space plasma become ‘classics’

Energy Arc, central electrode of a Plasma Lamp.
Energy Arc, central electrode of a Plasma Lamp.
via udel

New Observatory Takes Highest-Energy Particle Research to New Heights

As cosmic-ray particles are accelerated by a black hole in this artist's interpretation, they stream toward Earth as very-high-energy gamma-rays. Upon hitting the atmosphere, they produce a shower of particles that rain down on Earth. Most of these particles run out of energy before they hit sea level. Credit: Aurore Simonnet, Sonoma State University
As cosmic-ray particles are accelerated by a black hole in this artist’s interpretation, they stream toward Earth as very-high-energy gamma-rays. Upon hitting the atmosphere, they produce a shower of particles that rain down on Earth. Most of these particles run out of energy before they hit sea level. (Credit: Aurore Simonnet, Sonoma State University)
via space.com

New test may provide ‘smoking gun’ for modified gravity

A schematic picture of how researchers can observe galaxy peculiar velocities, “a cosmic dance of galaxies.” (Credit: Wojciech A. Hellwing)
A schematic picture of how researchers can observe galaxy peculiar velocities, “a cosmic dance of galaxies.” (Credit: Wojciech A. Hellwing)
via phys.org

Supermassive Black Hole Shows Strange Gas Movements

A Hubble Space Telescope image of NGC 5548. (Credit: ESA/Hubble and NASA. Davide de Martin)
A Hubble Space Telescope image of NGC 5548. (Credit: ESA/Hubble and NASA. Davide de Martin)
via universetoday

Slowly rotating neutron star paired with a red-giant star reveals properties that conflict with existing theory

An artist’s impression of an x-ray binary system. The matter that a neutron star (blue) sucks from a regular star (red) leads to the emission of intense x-ray beams. (Credit: NASA)
An artist’s impression of an x-ray binary system. The matter that a neutron star (blue) sucks from a regular star (red) leads to the emission of intense x-ray beams. (Credit: NASA)
via phys.org
Slowly rotating neutron star paired with a red-giant star reveals properties that conflict with existing theoryRead more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-06-slowly-rotating-neutron-star-paired.html#jCp
Slowly rotating neutron star paired with a red-giant star reveals properties that conflict with existing theoryRead more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-06-slowly-rotating-neutron-star-paired.html#jCp

Physics in the News

Friday, June 20, 2014

Nasa Picks Out Prime Targets For Asteroid Grab

An artist's conception of two possible views of asteroid 2011 MD. (Image courtesy NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory)
An artist’s conception of two possible views of asteroid 2011 MD. (Image courtesy NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory)
via nau

 

Some Highly Scientific Data 🙂 Physics Invents the Emoticon

The end of an era: Just 18 percent of survey respondents report using the full-faced emoticon.
The end of an era: Just 18 percent of survey respondents report using the full-faced emoticon. (Credit
via theatlantic

 

If Spacetime Were a Superfluid, Would It Unify Physics—or Is the Theory All Wet?

Light from the Crab Nebula (shown here in a Hubble Space Telescope photo) limits the possibilities for fluid spacetime. NASA/ESA/ASU/J. Hester
Light from the Crab Nebula (shown here in a Hubble Space Telescope photo) limits the possibilities for fluid spacetime. (Credit:NASA/ESA/ASU/J. Hester)
via scientificamerican
 

Swiftly Moving Gas Streamer Eclipses Supermassive Black Hole

This is an illustration of the physical, spatial and temporal picture for the outflows emanating from the vicinity of the super massive black hole in the galaxy NGC 5548. The behavior of the emission source in five epochs is shown along the time axis. The obscurer is situated at roughly 0.03 light years (0.01 parsecs) from the emission source and is only seen in 2011 and 2013 (it is much stronger in 2013). Outflow component 1 shows the most dramatic changes in its absorption troughs. Different observed ionic species are represented as colored zones within the absorbers. Credit: Ann Feild/Space Telescope Science Institute
This is an illustration of the physical, spatial and temporal picture for the outflows emanating from the vicinity of the super massive black hole in the galaxy NGC 5548. The behavior of the emission source in five epochs is shown along the time axis. The obscurer is situated at roughly 0.03 light years (0.01 parsecs) from the emission source and is only seen in 2011 and 2013 (it is much stronger in 2013). Outflow component 1 shows the most dramatic changes in its absorption troughs. Different observed ionic species are represented as colored zones within the absorbers. Credit: Ann Feild/Space Telescope Science Institute
via hubblesite
 

Dr. Ed Dowdye: Solar gravitation and solar plasma wave propagation on interaction – EU 2014

via thewatchers

 

Confirmed, finally: D-Wave quantum computer is sluggish

Jeremy Hilton, D-Wave's vice president of processor development, with one of the company's quantum computers. Screenshot by Nick Statt/CNET
Jeremy Hilton, D-Wave’s vice president of processor development, with one of the company’s quantum computers. Screenshot by Nick Statt/CNET
via cnet

Physics in the News

Thursday, June 19, 2014

This Shape-Shifter Could Tell Us Why Matter Exists

 An invisible neutrino entering a hydrogen bubble chamber from the right collides with a proton, leaving three visible particle pathways.
An invisible neutrino entering a hydrogen bubble chamber from the right collides with a proton, leaving three visible particle pathways.
via nautil.us

 

Gravity’s strength still an open question after latest measurement

Gravity field near earth at 1,2 and A the curvature of the Earth is negligible at this scale, and the gravity force lines can be approximated as being parallel and pointing straight down to the center of the Earth. (Credit: SA 3.0)

 

Field lines drawn for a point mass using 24 field lines The gravitational field can be represented using field lines. These run in the direction that a mass would be accelerated in initially. The object will not necessarily fall along the field lines, but the acceleration will always be in the direction of the field lines. The closer the field lines are together, the denser the gravitational field. (credit: CC BY-SA 3.0)
Field lines drawn for a point mass using 24 field lines. The gravitational field can be represented using field lines. These run in the direction that a mass would be accelerated in initially. The object will not necessarily fall along the field lines, but the acceleration will always be in the direction of the field lines. The closer the field lines are together, the denser the gravitational field.(credit: SA 3.0)

 

Will Venus Express Spacecraft Crash Or Keep Decoding Planet’s Secrets

This illustration of Venus Express shows it amid charged particles of solar wind in the upper layers of the Venusian atmosphere. (credit: ESA, AOES Medialab)
This illustration of Venus Express shows it amid charged particles of solar wind in the upper layers of the Venusian atmosphere. (Credit: ESA, AOES Medialab)
via nationalgeographic
 

NASA Dark-Energy Mission Could Spot 3,000 New Alien Planets

An artist's rendition of the proposed WFIRST-AFTA mission, which will study dark energy, extrasolar planets and objects in the near-infrared. (Credit: NASA)
An artist’s rendition of the proposed WFIRST-AFTA mission, which will study dark energy, extrasolar planets and objects in the near-infrared. (Credit: NASA)
via space.com

 

Universe’s Expansion Measured to Extreme Precision

An artist's view of how quasars and BOAs work together to measure the expansion of the universe. Light from distant quasars is absorbed by gas, which is imprinted with a pattern of BOAs from the early universe. Zosia Rostomian, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Andreu Font-Ribera, BOSS Lyman-alpha team, Berkeley Lab
An artist’s view of how quasars and BOAs work together to measure the expansion of the universe. Light from distant quasars is absorbed by gas, which is imprinted with a pattern of BOAs from the early universe. Zosia Rostomian, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Andreu Font-Ribera, BOSS Lyman-alpha team, Berkeley Lab
via discovery.com

 

To test the effect of gravity on quantum entanglement, we need to go to space

May 4, 1935 New York Times article headline regarding the imminent EPR paper.
May 4, 1935 New York Times article headline regarding the imminent EPR paper.
via theconversation

 

Hubble Telescope loosens Kuiper belt to reveal ICY BODY for NASA boffins’ PROBE

The Kuiper belt is a region beyond Neptune that is full of comets, asteroids and other debris. It circles the solar system and has always been a little bit of a mystery as it is so far away and hard to explore.(Credit: Chris Dann)
The Kuiper belt is a region beyond Neptune that is full of comets, asteroids and other debris. It circles the solar system and has always been a little bit of a mystery as it is so far away and hard to explore.(Credit: Chris Dann)
via theregister

Physics in the News

Wednesday,  June 18, 2014

New molecules around old stars

Herschel image of the Helix Nebula using the SPIRE instrument at wavelengths around 250 micrometres, superimposed on Hubble image of the nebula. The spectrum corresponds to the outer region of the Helix Nebula outlined on the SPIRE image. It identifies the OH+ molecular ion, which is needed for the formation of water. ESA’s Herschel space observatory is the first to detect this molecule in planetary nebulas – the product of dying Sun-like stars. Credit: Hubble image: NASA/ESA/C.R. O’Dell (Vanderbilt University), M. Meixner & P. McCullough (STScI); Herschel image: ESA/Herschel/SPIRE/MESS Consortium/M. Etxaluze et al.

via esa.int

 

2D electronic-vibrational spectroscopy technique provides unprecedented look into photochemical reactions

2-D-EV spectral data tells researchers how photoexcitation of a molecular system affects the coupling of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom that is essential to understanding how all molecules, molecular systems and nanomaterials function. Credit: Fleming group
2-D-EV spectral data tells researchers how photoexcitation of a molecular system affects the coupling of electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom that is essential to understanding how all molecules, molecular systems and nanomaterials function. Credit: Fleming group

via phys.org

 

Strange physics turns off laser

Manipulating minute areas of gain and loss within individual lasers (shown as peaks and valleys in the image), researchers were able to create paradoxical interactions between two nearby lasers. Credit: Vienna University of Technology
Manipulating minute areas of gain and loss within individual lasers (shown as peaks and valleys in the image), researchers were able to create paradoxical interactions between two nearby lasers. Credit: Vienna University of Technology

via technobahn

 

Big Bang theory breakthrough under scrutiny

This is an artist's concept of the metric expansion of space, where space (including hypothetical non-observable portions of the universe) is represented at each time by the circular sections.
This is an artist’s concept of the metric expansion of space, where space (including hypothetical non-observable portions of the universe) is represented at each time by the circular sections. Note on the left the dramatic expansion (not to scale) occurring in the inflationary epoch, and at the center the expansion acceleration

via inquisitr

 

Superconducting secrets solved after 30 years

 Map of superconducting copper oxide structure. Credit: Nicolle R Fuller

Map of superconducting copper oxide structure. Credit: Nicolle R Fuller

via cam.ac.uk

Superconducting secrets solved after 30 years

 

Superconducting secrets solved after 30 years

Surprisingly strong magnetic fields challenge black holes’ pull

This is a computer simulation of gas (in yellow) falling into a black hole (too small to be seen). Twin jets are also shown with magnetic field lines. Credit: Alexander Tchekhovskoy, Berkeley Lab
This is a computer simulation of gas (in yellow) falling into a black hole (too small to be seen). Twin jets are also shown with magnetic field lines. Credit: Alexander Tchekhovskoy, Berkeley Lab
This is a computer simulation of gas (in yellow) falling into a black hole (too small to be seen). Twin jets are also shown with magnetic field lines. Credit: Alexander Tchekhovskoy, Berkeley LabRead more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-06-surprisingly-strong-magnetic-fields-black.html#jCp

via phys.org