Physics in the News

Thursday, June 12, 2014

NASA Updating Status of LDSD ‘Flying Saucer’ at 1 p.m. EDT

The LDSD test article in the clean room at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, preparing for shipment to Hawaii for its first test launch this summer. LDSD will help land bigger space payloads on Mars or return them back to Earth. Photo Credit: AmericaSpace / Robert Fisher
via nasa

 

Map of universe questioned; dwarf galaxies don’t fit standard model

This picture of the galaxy UGC 10214 was taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), which was installed aboard the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope in March during Servicing Mission 3B.
This picture of the galaxy UGC 10214 was taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS), which was installed aboard the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope in March during Servicing Mission 3B.
via eurekalert
 

The solar wind breaks through the Earth’s magnetic field

 The study has been carried out with data from the four Cluster satellites.  (Photo Credit: Image: ESA)

The study has been carried out with data from the four Cluster satellites. (Photo Credit: Image: ESA)

via sciencecodex

EXO-200 narrows its search for Majorana neutrinos

This image shows the insertion of the EXO-200 detector into the cryostat 650 meters below ground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad (New Mexico). Image courtesy SLAC.
This image shows the insertion of the EXO-200 detector into the cryostat 650 meters below ground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad (New Mexico). Image courtesy SLAC.
via physicsworld

 

Kepler space telescope ready to start new hunt for exoplanets

Artist's impression of the Kepler telescope. Image courtesy NASA, Ames, JPL-Caltech.
Artist’s impression of the Kepler telescope. Image courtesy NASA, Ames, JPL-Caltech.
via spacedaily

 

Krauss, Wilczek honored with first prize from Gravity Research Foundation

The Krauss-Wilczek paper describes how the recent claimed discovery of gravitational waves from the early universe can provide definitive evidence that gravity must be understood as a quantum theory.
The Krauss-Wilczek paper describes how the recent claimed discovery of gravitational waves from the early universe can provide definitive evidence that gravity must be understood as a quantum theory.

via asunews

Physics in the News

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Sun Emits 3 X-class Flares in 2 Days

Three X-class flares erupted from the left side of the sun June 10-11, 2014. These images are from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory and show light in a blend of two ultraviolet wavelengths: 171 and 131 angstroms. The former is colorized in yellow; the latter, in red. Image Credit: NASA/SDO
Three X-class flares erupted from the left side of the sun June 10-11, 2014. These images are from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory and show light in a blend of two ultraviolet wavelengths: 171 and 131 angstroms. The former is colorized in yellow; the latter, in red.
Image Credit: NASA/SDO
via nasa.gov

 

Earth & moon 60 million years older than previously thought

AFP Photo/NASA
AFP Photo/NASA
via rt.com

 

NASA unveils its futuristic warp drive starship – called Enterprise, of course

Image by Mark Rademaker
Image by Mark Rademaker
via extremetech
 

Mars Rover Curiosity Watches Mercury Transit the Sun

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/Texas A&M
NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/Texas A&M
via discovery.com
 

Viewing deeper into the quantum world

Photo Credit: ICFO
Photo Credit: ICFO
via sciencecodex
 

Astronauts’ well-kept secret: ‘Space has a smell’

Tweet from @NASA
Tweet from @NASA

via washingtonpost.com

Physics in the News

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

The Simple Problem Einstein Couldn’t Solve … At First

Einstein fell for this teaser
Einstein fell for this teaser
via farnamstreetblog
 

Black hole? Or wormhole in disguise?

Wormholes-infographic

via cosmonline
 

55-year old dark side of the Moon mystery solved

This is a composite image of the lunar farside taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in June 2009, note the absence of dark areas. Credit: NASA
This is a composite image of the lunar farside taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in June 2009, note the absence of dark areas. Credit: NASA
via phys.org
 

Curiosity captures stunning new Mount Sharp panorama ‘on the go’

Curiosity rover panorama of Mount Sharp captured on June 6, 2014 (Sol 651) during traverse inside Gale Crater. Note rover wheel tracks at left. She will eventually ascend the mountain at the ‘Murray Buttes’ at right later this year. Assembled from Mastcam color camera raw images and stitched by Marco Di Lorenzo and Ken Kremer. Credit: NASA/JPL/MSSS/Marco Di Lorenzo
Curiosity rover panorama of Mount Sharp captured on June 6, 2014 (Sol 651) during traverse inside Gale Crater. Note rover wheel tracks at left. She will eventually ascend the mountain at the ‘Murray Buttes’ at right later this year. Assembled from Mastcam color camera raw images and stitched by Marco Di Lorenzo and Ken Kremer. Credit: NASA/JPL/MSSS/Marco Di Lorenzo
via phys.org

Physics in the News

Updated Monday, June 9, 2014

The Very First Vine From Space Captures A Sun That Never Sets

via io9

 

Quarks in six-packs: Exotic Particle Confirmed

For a long time, physicists were only able to reliably verify two different classes of hadrons: baryons and mesons. Experiments performed at Jülich’s accelerator COSY have now shown that, in fact, another class of exotic particles made up of six quarks exists. Credit: Forschungszentrum Jülich/SeitenPlan CC BY 4.0 Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-06-quarks-six-packs-exotic-particle.html#jCp
For a long time, physicists were only able to reliably verify two different classes of hadrons: baryons and mesons. Experiments performed at Jülich’s accelerator COSY have now shown that, in fact, another class of exotic particles made up of six quarks exists. Credit: Forschungszentrum Jülich/SeitenPlan CC BY 4.0

via phys.org

 

Space Weather Report for an Alien World

Space weather report for Venus
via esa.int

 

Researchers find evidence of speedy core formation in solar system planetesimals

Planetary core formation. Credit: Speed metal, Science 6 June 2014.
Planetary core formation. Credit: Speed metal, Science 6 June 2014.
via phys.org

 

Quantum black holes at the LHC: production and decay mechanisms of non-thermal microscopic black holes in particle collisions

This annotated image labels several features in the simulation, including the event horizon of the black hole. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center
This annotated image labels several features in the simulation, including the event horizon of the black hole. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center
via sussex.ac.uk

 

Physics in the News

Updated Sunday, June 8, 2014

Scientists: The Universe’s Most Common Stars Could Make Alien Life Impossible

Artist conception of a rocky planet in a binary star-system, one of which is a red dwarf. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt via Getty Images)
Artist conception of a rocky planet in a binary star-system, one of which is a red dwarf. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt via Getty Images)
via tampa.cbslocal.com

 

New Suspect Identified in Supernova Explosion

This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows N103B -- all that remains from a supernova that exploded a millennium ago in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy 160,000 light-years away from our own Milky Way. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Goddard
This infrared image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope shows N103B — all that remains from a supernova that exploded a millennium ago in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy 160,000 light-years away from our own Milky Way. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Goddard
via nasa.gov
 

Astronauts aboard ISS breeding Japanese fish, growing mosquitoes

© Photo: nias.affrc.go.jp
© Photo: nias.affrc.go.jp
via voiceofrussia
 

Space Oddity: Bizarre Hybrid Star Found After 40-Year Search

Credit: Phil Massey, Lowell Observatory
Credit: Phil Massey, Lowell Observatory
via space.com
 

Lasers ignite ‘supernova’ in the lab

This composite shows the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant that has magnetic fields that are approximately 100 times stronger than those in adjacent interstellar space. (NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration, CXC/SAO/JPL-Caltech/Steward/O. Krause et al., and NRAO/AUI)
This composite shows the Cassiopeia A supernova remnant that has magnetic fields that are approximately 100 times stronger than those in adjacent interstellar space. (NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT Collaboration, CXC/SAO/JPL-Caltech/Steward/O. Krause et al., and NRAO/AUI)
via theepochtimes.com