Physics in the News

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Life in space? Sea plankton discovered attached to ISS outer hull

Creature from the deep: Bioluminescence plankton at Penmon. (Credit: Kris Williams )
via rt

Scientists discover potential signs of life on Mars

NASA’s Mars Curiosity Rover captures a selfie to mark a full Martian year — 687 Earth days — spent exploring the Red Planet. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)
Scientists have discovered mineral-rich structure on Mars that might be the evidence of niche environment on the planet’s subsurface that could support life. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)
via aninews

SpaceX denies report it is raising massive funding round, valued at $10B

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk and the new Dragon V2, which will soon carry people to the International Space Station (Credit: SpaceX_
SpaceX CEO Elon Musk and the new Dragon V2, which will soon carry people to the International Space Station (Credit: SpaceX)
via gigaom

Why didn’t the Universe become a black hole?

In Einstein’s general theory of relativity, gravity is nothing more than the curvature of spacetime. A massive object, such as the sun, causes a deformation of the spacetime grid, while another object such as a planet or a light beam follows the shortest path (a “geodesic”) on this grid. To an observer, this looks like a deflection of the trajectory caused by gravity. (Bottom) A collapsing star can form a black hole so dense and massive that it creates a region of infinite curvature (a “singularity”) so that—inside the event horizon—light cannot escape. Current research in gravitation is attempting to modify general relativity to account for such objects consistent with quantum theory. (Credit: Carin Cain)
In Einstein’s general theory of relativity, gravity is nothing more than the curvature of spacetime. A massive object, such as the sun, causes a deformation of the spacetime grid, while another object such as a planet or a light beam follows the shortest path (a “geodesic”) on this grid. To an observer, this looks like a deflection of the trajectory caused by gravity. (Bottom) A collapsing star can form a black hole so dense and massive that it creates a region of infinite curvature (a “singularity”) so that—inside the event horizon—light cannot escape. Current research in gravitation is attempting to modify general relativity to account for such objects consistent with quantum theory. (Credit: Carin Cain)
via medium

Study reveals immune system is dazed and confused during spaceflight

European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, Expedition 30 flight engineer, prepares vials in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station for venous blood sample draws during an immune system investigation. (Credit: NASA)
European Space Agency astronaut Andre Kuipers, Expedition 30 flight engineer, prepares vials in the Columbus laboratory of the International Space Station for venous blood sample draws during an immune system investigation. (Credit: NASA)
via phys.org

Sizing up an Exoplanet(VIDEO)

via NASA

Theoretical physics: The origins of space and time(VIDEO)

via nature

 So what exactly is a ‘killer robot’?

For as long as we’ve been able to make robots, we’ve been worried about them killing us. (Credit:  Ociacia/Shutterstock)
For as long as we’ve been able to make robots, we’ve been worried about them killing us. (Credit: Ociacia/Shutterstock)

Robots to cook and serve food in restaurant in Kunshan, China

 A robot carries food to customers in a restaurant in Kunshan, China. Photo: Johannes Eisele. (Credit: AFP)
A robot carries food to customers in a restaurant in Kunshan, China. Photo: Johannes Eisele. (Credit: AFP)
via news.com

New ‘mapping nearby galaxies at Apache Point observatory’ survey launched

Shown above is part of one of the most imaged parts of the night sky, the Orion Nebula. Since the angular size of Orion's Nebula is so large on the sky, only a portion is shown here. Located just below "Orion's Belt" this star-forming region is dominated by four young, massive O stars (known as the Trapezium, not pictured here). The wispy blue, green gas seen above is composed mostly of hydrogen, the main element used in forming stars. The Orion Nebula is an astrophysical laboratory, providing an up-close view of the birth of stars (Credit: Sloan Digital Sky Survey)
Shown above is part of one of the most imaged parts of the night sky, the Orion Nebula. Since the angular size of Orion’s Nebula is so large on the sky, only a portion is shown here. Located just below “Orion’s Belt” this star-forming region is dominated by four young, massive O stars (known as the Trapezium, not pictured here). The wispy blue, green gas seen above is composed mostly of hydrogen, the main element used in forming stars. The Orion Nebula is an astrophysical laboratory, providing an up-close view of the birth of stars. (Credit: Sloan Digital Sky Survey)

via azoquantum

Alternative propulsion concepts power debate

Greased Lighning (GL10) project 10 engine electric prototype remote control plane. Photo taken 8/14/14 (Credit: NASA Langley/David C. Bowman)
Greased Lighning (GL10) project 10 engine electric prototype remote control plane. Photo taken 8/14/14 (Credit: NASA Langley/David C. Bowman)
via thespacereview

Indian nuclear team head to US

A file photograph of Adani Power's thermal power plant in the western Indian state of Gujarat.(Credit: Reuters)
A file photograph of Adani Power’s thermal power plant in the western Indian state of Gujarat.(Credit: Reuters)
via breakbulk

South Korea running out of spent nuclear fuel storage space – advisory body

The Kori nuclear power plant in Busan, southeast of Seoul, is seen in this picture released by the plant to Reuters.  South Korea needs to quickly find additional space where it can store its spent nuclear fuel because some of its temporary storage capacity will be full by 2016, (Credit: Reuters/Kori Nuclear Power Plant/Handout)
via reuters

Physics in the News

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

First indirect evidence of undetected strange Baryons

CDF physicist Petar Maksimovic, professor at Johns Hopkins University, presented the discovery to the particle physics community at Fermilab. He explained that the two types of Sigma-sub-b particles are produced in two different spin combinations, J=1/2 and J=3/2, representing a ground state and an excited state, as predicted by theory. (Credit: Fermilab)
CDF physicist Petar Maksimovic, professor at Johns Hopkins University, presented the discovery to the particle physics community at Fermilab. He explained that the two types of Sigma-sub-b particles are produced in two different spin combinations, J=1/2 and J=3/2, representing a ground state and an excited state, as predicted by theory. (Credit: Fermilab)
via newswise

Curiosity Rover on Mars Stalled by ‘Hidden Valley’ Sand Trap

This image, taken by NASA's Mars rover Curiosity in August 2014, looks across the northeastern end of sandy "Hidden Valley" to the lower slopes of Mount Sharp on the horizon. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)
This image, taken by NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity in August 2014, looks across the northeastern end of sandy “Hidden Valley” to the lower slopes of Mount Sharp on the horizon.
(Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)
via space.com

Сalculations with nanoscale smart particles

Nanoparcticles producing logical calculations. (Credit: Maxim Nikitin)
Nanoparcticles producing logical calculations. (Credit: Maxim Nikitin)
via phys

Scientific error delayed the search for alien life

Scientists of the early 20th century argued that tidal forces had caused the sun to spit out the planets when a rogue star passed too close. It was a kind of drive-by shooting theory of planetary formation known as the "Planetesimal Hypothesis." (Credit: NASA, M. Strauss)
Scientists of the early 20th century argued that tidal forces had caused the sun to spit out the planets when a rogue star passed too close. It was a kind of drive-by shooting theory of planetary formation known as the “Planetesimal Hypothesis.” (Credit: NASA, M. Strauss)
via io9

SpaceX releases video of reusable rocket’s soft splashdown(VIDEO)

via valuewalk

Scientists unveil new technology to better understand small clusters of atoms

An illustration of the extent to which the atoms, in a small cluster of atoms, vibrate. The spheres represent the range of motion of the atoms, rather than the atoms themselves – the spheres have been exaggerated in size by 45 times in order to ease visualisation. The atoms on the surface have larger ranges of motion than those in the middle of the cluster. (Credit: University of York)
An illustration of the extent to which the atoms, in a small cluster of atoms, vibrate. The spheres represent the range of motion of the atoms, rather than the atoms themselves – the spheres have been exaggerated in size by 45 times in order to ease visualisation. The atoms on the surface have larger ranges of motion than those in the middle of the cluster. (Credit: University of York)
via york
 The ExoLance Concept. "Arrows" fall from a spacecraft, penetrate the ground, and expose the life-detecting equipment inside. (Credit: Explore Mars Inc.)
The ExoLance Concept: “Arrows” fall from a spacecraft, penetrate the ground, and expose the life-detecting equipment inside. (Credit: Explore Mars Inc.)
via popsci

NASA will basically play SimAnt with new “Swarmies” robots

NASA engineers have built four robots nicknamed “Swarmies” to test whether a group of robots can autonomously and effectively scout an area for resources, and they’ve model the software design after how ants do the same thing. (Credit:  NASA/D. Gerondidakis, G. Tickle)
NASA engineers have built four robots nicknamed “Swarmies” to test whether a group of robots can autonomously and effectively scout an area for resources, and they’ve model the software design after how ants do the same thing. (Credit: NASA/D. Gerondidakis, G. Tickle)
via themarysue

New research improves quantum coherence time using cavity protection effect

The quantum system studied at TU Wien (Vienna): a black diamond (center) contains nitrogen atoms, which are coupled to a microwave resonator. (Credit: TU Wien)
The quantum system studied at TU Wien (Vienna): a black diamond (center) contains nitrogen atoms, which are coupled to a microwave resonator. (Credit: TU Wien)
via azoquantum

Recycling old batteries into solar cells

This could be a classic win-win solution: A system proposed by researchers at MIT recycles materials from discarded car batteries—a potential source of lead pollution—into new, long-lasting solar panels that provide emissions-free power. (Credit: Christine Daniloff/MIT)
This could be a classic win-win solution: A system proposed by researchers at MIT recycles materials from discarded car batteries—a potential source of lead pollution—into new, long-lasting solar panels that provide emissions-free power. (Credit: Christine Daniloff/MIT)
via phys.org

The machine that tried to scan the brain – in 1882

 Angelo Mosso's "human circulation balance" machine worked like a seesaw to measure blood flow changes to the brain. (Credit: Stefano Sandrone et al.)

Angelo Mosso’s “human circulation balance” machine worked like a seesaw to measure blood flow changes to the brain. (Credit: Stefano Sandrone et al.)
via npr

Space X Falcon 9 night time launch planned

via examiner

 Which came last—The supernova or the red giant?

 A red giant star really is quite gigantic compared to our Sun. (Credit: NASA)
A red giant star really is quite gigantic compared to our Sun. (Credit: NASA)

via arstechnica

Physics in the News

Monday August 18, 2014

Rubbish explodes in space

Astronaut Alexander Gerst captured the moment from his home aboard the ISS. (Credit: Alexander Gerst)
Astronaut Alexander Gerst captured the moment from his home aboard the ISS. (Credit: Alexander Gerst)
via theregister

Spacewalking cosmonaut tosses tiny satellite into space for Peru

Cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev looks on after he released a small Peruvian satellite into space during a spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Aug. 18, 2014. (Credit: NASA TV)
Cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev looks on after he released a small Peruvian satellite into space during a spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Aug. 18, 2014.
(Credit: NASA TV)
via space

Novel technique to record quantum mechanical behavior of an electron within a nanoscale defect

Part of the optical apparatus used to direct pulses of light to control the quantum state of a single electronic spin in diamond. (Credit:  UPenn)
Part of the optical apparatus used to direct pulses of light to control the quantum state of a single electronic spin in diamond. (Credit: UPenn)
via azoquantum

Image overload:  NASA requests help to sort it all out

North Korea is barely lit when juxtaposed with neighboring South Korea and China. (Credit NASA)
North Korea is barely lit when juxtaposed with neighboring South Korea and China. (Credit NASA)
via cnn

Set your alarm: Venus and Jupiter will light up the pre-dawn sky

A panoramic view of the Venus Jupiter Conjunction on August 17, 2014, taken from the Cairns Esplanade in Queensland Australia. (Credit: Joseph Brimacombe.)
A panoramic view of the Venus Jupiter Conjunction on August 17, 2014, taken from the Cairns Esplanade in Queensland Australia. (Credit: Joseph Brimacombe)
via bbc

Black Holes? I’ll take a medium, please

To celebrate the NASA-ESA Hubble Space Telescopes 16 years of success, NASA and the European Space Agency are releasing this mosaic image of the starburst galaxy, Messier 82 (M82),  made in March 2006. It is the sharpest wide-angle view ever obtained of M82, a galaxy remarkable for its webs of shredded clouds and flame-like plumes of glowing hydrogen blasting out from its central regions. Located 12 million light-years away, it is also called the "Cigar Galaxy" because of the elongated elliptical shape produced by the tilt of its starry disk relative to our line of sight. (AP Photo/NASA-ESA)
To celebrate the NASA-ESA Hubble Space Telescopes 16 years of success, NASA and the European Space Agency are releasing this mosaic image of the starburst galaxy, Messier 82 (M82), made in March 2006. It is the sharpest wide-angle view ever obtained of M82, a galaxy remarkable for its webs of shredded clouds and flame-like plumes of glowing hydrogen blasting out from its central regions. Located 12 million light-years away, it is also called the “Cigar Galaxy” because of the elongated elliptical shape produced by the tilt of its starry disk relative to our line of sight. (AP Photo/NASA-ESA)
via time

Quantum computing methodology a gigantic leap for next gen development

Quantum computing Adiabatic quantum computer component array: methodology is certainly going to be a gigantic leap for next gen development.

via nvonews

Fascinating rhythm: Light pulses illuminate a rare black hole

This image of the galaxy Messier 82 is a composite of data from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope. The intermediate-mass black hole M82 X-1 is the brightest object in the inset, at approximately 2 o'clock near the galaxy's center. (Credit: NASA/H. Feng et al.)
This image of the galaxy Messier 82 is a composite of data from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope and the Spitzer Space Telescope. The intermediate-mass black hole M82 X-1 is the brightest object in the inset, at approximately 2 o’clock near the galaxy’s center. (Credit: NASA/H. Feng et al.)
via phys

Physics in the News

Saturday, August 16, 2014

NASA develops origami style solar panels to be used in space(VIDEO)

via designboom

The improbable case of the high-energy novae: NASA’s Fermi space telescope detects new gamma ray sources

Novae typically originate in binary systems containing Sun-like stars, as shown in this artist’s rendering. NASA’s Fermi Space Telescope discovered that a nova in a system like this likely produces gamma rays (magenta) through collisions among multiple shock waves in the rapidly expanding shell of debris. (Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/S. Wiessinger)
Novae typically originate in binary systems containing Sun-like stars, as shown in this artist’s rendering. NASA’s Fermi Space Telescope discovered that a nova in a system like this likely produces gamma rays (magenta) through collisions among multiple shock waves in the rapidly expanding shell of debris. (Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/S. Wiessinger)
via americaspace

Electrons in magnetic field reveal surprises

Beam out: elongated "Landau" states - Instead of rotating uniformly at a particular frequency, an international team of researchers has found that electrons in a magnetic field are capable of rotating at three different frequencies, depending on their quantum properties.
Beam out: elongated “Landau” states – Instead of rotating uniformly at a particular frequency, an international team of researchers has found that electrons in a magnetic field are capable of rotating at three different frequencies, depending on their quantum properties.
via physicsworld

How can we clean up that space junk(VIDEO)?

via universetoday

Weird blurred light near giant black hole(VIDEO)

via space

UT research uncovers forces that hold gravity defying near earth asteroid together

Asteroid 1950 DA. “Following the February 2013 asteroid impact in Chelyabinsk, Russia, there is renewed interest in figuring out how to deal with the potential hazard of an asteroid impact,” said Rozitis. “Understanding what holds these asteroids together can inform strategies to guard against future impacts.” (Credit: NASA)
Asteroid 1950 DA. “Following the February 2013 asteroid impact in Chelyabinsk, Russia, there is renewed interest in figuring out how to deal with the potential hazard of an asteroid impact,” said Rozitis. “Understanding what holds these asteroids together can inform strategies to guard against future impacts.” (Credit: NASA)
via tntoday

‘Monster’ quasars got that way by gorging on gas

"The puzzle has been how these 'seed' black holes grew into the monsters that we now see within the time available, a few billion years at best," says Priyamvada Natarajan, who proposes that early quasars took in a "super boost," feasting from large reservoirs of gas that were part of early star clusters. (Credit: Lollito Larkham/Flickr)
“The puzzle has been how these ‘seed’ black holes grew into the monsters that we now see within the time available, a few billion years at best,” says Priyamvada Natarajan, who proposes that early quasars took in a “super boost,” feasting from large reservoirs of gas that were part of early star clusters. (Credit: Lollito Larkham/Flickr)
via futurity

LHC research, presented in tangible tidbits

via symmetrymagazine

NASA sleep promoting light bulb hopes to send you to snoozeland, ASAP!

Lighting Science created special lightbulbs for the ISS. There are daylight bulbs with bluer light to encourage energy and activity during what would be daytime hours, and then there are lightbulbs that dial back on the blue to boost astronauts’ production of melatonin for a good night’s sleep. (Credit: Lightning Science)
via cnet

NASA funds robotic tumbling cubes for space exploration

via spectrum

Physics in the News

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

First robotic telescope captures clear images of exoplanet stars

via spectrum

What?! The universe appears to be missing some light

New data from the Hubble Space Telescope and computer simulations have revealed that the universe has much less ultraviolet light than previously thought. (Credit: Ben Oppenheimer and Juna Kollmeie)
New data from the Hubble Space Telescope and computer simulations have revealed that the universe has much less ultraviolet light than previously thought.
(Credit: Ben Oppenheimer and Juna Kollmeie)
via space

Here’s the world’s first robotics company to pledge not to make ‘killer robots’

Clearpath Robotics "Husky," an autonomous vehicle. (Credit: Clearpath Robotics)
“Husky,” an autonomous vehicle. (Credit: Clearpath Robotics)

via businessinsider

Planck’s mystery cosmic ‘cold spot’ may be an error

The European Space Agency's Planck space telescope mapped the cosmic microwave background. (Credit: ESA and the Planck Collaboration)
The European Space Agency’s Planck space telescope mapped the cosmic microwave background. (Credit: ESA and the Planck Collaboration)
via space

Proof confirmed of 400-year-old fruit-stacking problem

Now, a mathematician has announced the completion of an epic quest to formally prove the so-called Kepler conjecture. “An enormous burden has been lifted from my shoulders,” says Thomas Hales of the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who led the work. “I suddenly feel ten years younger!” (Credit: Ray Tang/Rex)
via newscientist

Introducing this year’s underground astronauts

Astronauts will be working together, deep underground. (Credit: ESA—A. Romeo)
Astronauts will be working together, deep underground. (Credit: ESA—A. Romeo)
via phys

How to build a supermassive black hole in less than a billion years

This artist's rendering shows one possible configuration for a corona, but that its true shape is unknown. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

via arstechnica