Physics in the News

Thursday, August 28, 2014

“Spooky” quantum entanglement reveals invisible objects

In the new experiment, the physicists entangled photons in two separate laser beams with different wavelengths, and hence color: one yellow and one red.
“This is a long-standing, really neat experimental idea,” says Paul Lett, of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in GaithersburgLett, “Now we have to see whether or not it will lead to something practical, or will remain just a clever demonstration of quantum mechanics.”(CreditBarreto-Lemos, Vergano)
via nationalgeographic

Strange neutrinos from the sun detected for the first time

The Borexino neutrino detector uses a sphere filled with liquid scintillator that emits light when excited. This inner vessel is surrounded by layers of shielding and by about 2,000 photomultiplier tubes to detect the light flashes.(Credit: Borexino Collaboration)
The Borexino neutrino detector uses a sphere filled with liquid scintillator that emits light when excited. This inner vessel is surrounded by layers of shielding and by about 2,000 photomultiplier tubes to detect the light flashes.(Credit: Borexino Collaboration)
via scientificamerican

Quark quartet fuels quantum feud

meson-molecule
MOLECULAR MODEL In the molecular model, quark-antiquark pairs form two color-neutral mesons that become weakly linked as a molecule.
DIQUARK MODEL In the diquark model, the particles form quark-quark and antiquark-antiquark pairs, which are forced to combine to balance their color charges.
DIQUARK MODEL The particles form quark-quark and antiquark-antiquark pairs, which are forced to combine to balance their color charges.
via simonsfoundation

What lit up the universe?

A computer model shows one scenario for how light is spread through the early universe on vast scales (more than 50 million light years across). Astronomers will soon know whether or not these kinds of computer models give an accurate portrayal of light in the real cosmos. (Credit: Andrew Pontzen/Fabio Governato)
A computer model shows one scenario for how light is spread through the early universe on vast scales (more than 50 million light years across). Astronomers will soon know whether or not these kinds of computer models give an accurate portrayal of light in the real cosmos. (Credit: Andrew Pontzen/Fabio Governato)
via phys

What happened to NASA’s Valkyrie Robot at the DRC Trials, and what’s next

via spectrum

Pebble-sized particles may jump-start planet formation

Radio/optical composite of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex showing the OMC-2/3 star-forming filament. GBT data is shown in orange. Uncommonly large dust grains there may kick-start planet formation. (Credit: S. Schnee, et al.; B. Saxton, B. Kent (NRAO/AUI/NSF)
Radio/optical composite of the Orion Molecular Cloud Complex showing the OMC-2/3 star-forming filament. GBT data is shown in orange. Uncommonly large dust grains there may kick-start planet formation. (Credit: S. Schnee, et al.; B. Saxton, B. Kent (NRAO/AUI/NSF)
via rdmag

Physicists propose superabsorption of light beyond the limits of classical physics

In one potential method to realize superabsorption, a superabsorbing ring absorbs incident photons, giving rise to excitons. (Credit: Higgins, et al.)
In one potential method to realize superabsorption, a superabsorbing ring absorbs incident photons, giving rise to excitons. (Credit: Higgins, et al.)
via phys.org

Physics in the News

Monday, August 25, 2014

Galileo satellites go into wrong, lower orbit(VIDEO)

via bbc

Nobel prize winner: Let’s find dark matter and dark energy

This picture shows ALMA antennas pointing towards the centre of the milky-way. (Photo: ESO, B. Tafreshi)
Dark matter and dark energy continue to be cosmological conundrum for physicists worldwide. Nobel prize winner Brian Schmidt offers his perspective in an interview. The image shown here is of the ALMA antennas and the constellations of Carina (The Keel) and Vela (The Sails). The dark, wispy dust clouds of the Milky Way streak from middle top left to middle bottom right. (Credit: ESO, B. Tafreshi)
via sciencenordic

Pluto and the other dwarf planets could have astrobiological potential

“Our model predicts different fracture patterns on the surface of Charon depending on the thickness of its surface ice, the structure of the moon’s interior and how easily it deforms, and how its orbit evolved,” said Alyssa Rhoden of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. (Credit: NASA)
via dailygalaxy

Soft infrastructure challenges to scientific knowledge discovery

Open network environments have become essential in the sciences, enabling accelerated discovery and communication of knowledge. Yet, the real revolution began when open community databases allowed researchers to build on existing contributions and compare their results to established knowledge. (Credit: King, Uhlir)
via acm

Physicists attempt quantum clean-up experiment to right old error

Indian physicists propose a tabletop experiment that will provide scientists their first opportunity to measure the probability that particles can move through slits in a twisted path, depicted by the purple ray. (Credit: Aninda Sinha and Urbasi Sinha)
via telegraphindia

Vision correcting displays could spell the end of wearing glasses

via crazyengineers

World’s largest laser compresses diamond to pressures of 50 million Earth atmospheres

Physicists in the US have compressed a synthetic diamond to pressures of 50 million Earth atmospheres to recreate conditions in the cores of giant planets. (Credit: National Ignition Facility)
Physicists in the US have compressed a synthetic diamond to pressures of 50 million Earth atmospheres to recreate conditions in the cores of giant planets. (Credit: National Ignition Facility)
via sciencealert

An interesting glimpse into how future state of the art electronics might work

. A novel class of electronic materials – the so-called transition-metal oxides – hold promise for exciting, new applications. Where layers of this novel class of electronic materials touch, often a unique, and unprecedented phenomenon occurs: for instance, the interface between two insulators can become superconducting, or a strong magnetic order can build up between two non-magnetic layers.
. A novel class of electronic materials – the so-called transition-metal oxides – hold promise for exciting, new applications. Where layers of this novel class of electronic materials touch, often a unique, and unprecedented phenomenon occurs: for instance, the interface between two insulators can become superconducting, or a strong magnetic order can build up between two non-magnetic layers.
via phys.org

Physics in the News

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Asteroid defies laws of physics, baffles researchers

 WISE thermal-infrared images of (29075) 1950 DA. The image scale is 2.75 arcsec per pixel for the W1, W2 and W3 bands and 5.53 arcsec per pixel for the W4 band. White pixels are ‘bad’ pixels that do not contain data. The object seen to the upper left of (29075) 1950 DA (red circle) (Credit: Rozitis, MacLennan & Emery)
WISE thermal-infrared images of (29075) 1950 DA. The image scale is 2.75 arcsec per pixel for the W1, W2 and W3 bands and 5.53 arcsec per pixel for the W4 band. White pixels are ‘bad’ pixels that do not contain data. The object seen in the red circle is  (29075) 1950 DA. (Credit: Rozitis, MacLennan, Emery)
via techtimes

Hubble eyes galaxy as it gets a cosmic hair ruffling

From objects as small as Newton's apple to those as large as a galaxy, no physical body is free from the stern bonds of gravity, as evidenced in this stunning picture captured by the Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. (Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Luca Limatola)
From objects as small as Newton’s apple to those as large as a galaxy, no physical body is free from the stern bonds of gravity, as evidenced in this stunning picture captured by the Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. (Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Luca Limatola)
via phys

Novel project to develop tiny flat molecule tapes

Alissa Wiengarten, PhD student at the TUM Department of Physics, heats a porphine powder in a vacuum chamber. (Credit: Thorsten Naeser/Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics)
via azonano

Quantum-Memory imprint discovered in light emission

Semiconductor quantum-dot microring laser emits light whose emission intensity exhibits oscillations due to quantum memory between excitation and light Emission. Pressestelle der Philipps-Universität Marburg/Fachgebiet Theoretische Halbleiterphysik
Semiconductor quantum-dot microring laser emits light whose emission intensity exhibits oscillations due to quantum memory between excitation and light Emission. (Credit: Philipps-Universität Marburg/Fachgebiet Theoretische Halbleiterphysik)
via innovations-report

Investigating soil moisture dynamics using cosmic-ray technology

Dr Rosolem with the cosmic-ray soil moisture sensor installed at the the Federal University of Santa Maria SulFlux site in Brazil
Dr Rosolem with the cosmic-ray soil moisture sensor installed at the the Federal University of Santa Maria SulFlux site in Brazil. (Credit: Univ Bristol)
via bristol

Particle physicists measure the spin contribution of the proton’s antiquark

 The STAR detector, used in the researchers' experiment, measures the energy and angle of the electron from the W boson decay produced in the proton collision. (Credit: STAR Collaboration)
The STAR detector, used in the researchers’ experiment, measures the energy and angle of the electron from the W boson decay produced in the proton collision. (Credit: STAR Collaboration)
via phys

Nanosilver gives electron microscopy a boost

Experimental arrangement. A tip is approached to a distance of micrometres from a grounded highly ordered pyrolytic graphene (HOPG) surface carrying Ag nanostructures (illustrated in the inset). Electrons are field-emitted from the tip when a negative tip voltage Vt of hundreds of volts is applied, and the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the Ag nanostructures is excited by the field-emitted electrons under a strong electric field introduced by the tip–sample bias. The backscattered electrons are collected and analysed by the TEEA. (Credit: Nature Physics (2014) doi:10.1038/nphys3051)
Experimental arrangement. A tip is approached to a distance of micrometres from a grounded highly ordered pyrolytic graphene (HOPG) surface carrying Ag nanostructures (illustrated in the inset). Electrons are field-emitted from the tip when a negative tip voltage Vt of hundreds of volts is applied, and the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the Ag nanostructures is excited by the field-emitted electrons under a strong electric field introduced by the tip–sample bias. The backscattered electrons are collected and analysed by the TEEA. (Credit: Nature Physics (2014) doi:10.1038/nphys3051)
via asianscientist

Supermassive black holes’ diets revealed: Crushed stars and X-rays

Because of that alacrity, and the fact that they had repeat observations at roughly a decade's detach, the Russian scientists were able to single out stars that dimmed by at least tenfold. They've been named 1RXS J114727.1 + 494302, 1RXS J130547.2 + 641252, and 1RXS J235424.5-102053. (Credit: Davies, NASA)
Because of that alacrity, and the fact that they had repeat observations at roughly a decade’s detach, the Russian scientists were able to single out stars that dimmed by at least tenfold. They’ve been named 1RXS J114727.1 + 494302, 1RXS J130547.2 + 641252, and 1RXS J235424.5-102053. (Credit: Davies, NASA)
via slashgear

Could Mystery Signal Detected Be Proof of Dark Matter?

Could a mystery signal that has been detected be proof of dark matter? While searching through the fundamental structures of various galaxy clusters, astrophysicists located at Harvard University found a bizarre discharge line they are having trouble in identifying.  (Credit: Kimberly Ruble)
Could a mystery signal that has been detected be proof of dark matter? While searching through the fundamental structures of various galaxy clusters, astrophysicists located at Harvard University found a bizarre discharge line they are having trouble in identifying. (Credit: Kimberly Ruble)
via guardianlv

Physics in the News

Sunday, July 27, 2014

A cosmic two-step: The universal dance of the Dwarf Galaxies

The coherent dance of dwarf orbits around the Andromeda Galaxy. (Credit: R. Ibata/Nature)
The coherent dance of dwarf orbits around the Andromeda Galaxy. (Credit: R. Ibata/Nature)
via theepochtimes

Webb Sunshield Stacks Up to Test!

The James Webb Space Telescope (sometimes called JWST) is an orbiting infrared observatory that will complement and extend the discoveries of the Hubble Space Telescope, with longer wavelength coverage and greatly improved sensitivity.(Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn)
The James Webb Space Telescope (sometimes called JWST) is an orbiting infrared observatory that will complement and extend the discoveries of the Hubble Space Telescope, with longer wavelength coverage and greatly improved sensitivity.(Credit: NASA/Chris Gunn)
via nasa

NASA Preps for nail-biting comet flyby of Mars

Simulation depicts comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring during its close Mars flyby on Oct. 19. Its nucleus will miss Mars by about 82,000 miles (132,000 kilometers). The comet’s trail of dust particles shed by the nucleus might be wide enough to reach the planet. Click to see the interactive, animated view. (Credit: Solarsystemscope.com)
Simulation depicts comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring during its close Mars flyby on Oct. 19. Its nucleus will miss Mars by about 82,000 miles (132,000 kilometers). The comet’s trail of dust particles shed by the nucleus might be wide enough to reach the planet. Click to see the interactive, animated view. (Credit: Solarsystemscope.com)
via universetoday

Princeton man drawing attention to outer space

Justin Dowd, a Princeton man who won a contest and will be traveling into outer space next year, sits next to an illustration used in the opening scene of his educational video. (Credit: T&G Staff/STEVE LANAVA)
Justin Dowd, a Princeton man who won a contest and will be traveling into outer space next year, sits next to an illustration used in the opening scene of his educational video. (Credit: T&G Staff/STEVE LANAVA)

via telegram

Sometimes a typo means you need to blow up your own spacecraft

via vice

Listening in on cosmic messages

Mapping signals on the sky can offer clues about where the signals originate. Pulsars (top) concentrate in the Milky Way, because most of the ones we see sit in our galaxy. Gamma bursts (middle) come from everywhere, which means they’re parked in other galaxies. Fast radio bursts (bottom) seem to mostly avoid our galgaxy, a hint that they may come from very far away.(Credits: Green Bank Telescope, West Virginia Univ; G. Fishman et al/BATSE, CGRO, NASA.; J. Carpenter, T.H. Jarrett/2MASS, R. Hurt, C. Crockett)
Mapping signals on the sky can offer clues about where the signals originate. Pulsars (top) concentrate in the Milky Way, because most of the ones we see sit in our galaxy. Gamma bursts (middle) come from everywhere, which means they’re parked in other galaxies. Fast radio bursts (bottom) seem to mostly avoid our galgaxy, a hint that they may come from very far away.(Credits: Green Bank Telescope, West Virginia Univ; G. Fishman et al/BATSE, CGRO, NASA.; J. Carpenter, T.H. Jarrett/2MASS, R. Hurt, C. Crockett)
via sciencenews

Physicist thinks lack of evidence for inflation, multiverse a cosmic “deal-breaker”

Evidence of gravitational waves in the infant universe may have been uncovered by the BICEP2 radio telescope. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)
Evidence of gravitational waves in the infant universe may have been uncovered by the BICEP2 radio telescope. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)
via uncommondescent

Mars Mission advocated to a packed room at Comic-Con

The first Giant Leap was Apollo 11 landing astronauts on the moon. The next Giant Leap could be Apollo 45 landing humans on Mars. (Credit: NASA)
The first Giant Leap was Apollo 11 landing astronauts on the moon. The next Giant Leap could be Apollo 45 landing humans on Mars. (Credit: NASA)
via io9

Physics in the News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Scientists set new record by discovering the two most distant stars ever found in the milky way

Density, temperature, and CII projections along the y-axis at a scale of 1 pc, for three different metallicities. (Credit: University of Göttingen)
via inquisitr

Optical fibres from thin air

An “air waveguide” has been used to enhance light signals collected from distant sources. A single waveguide could be used to send out a laser and collect a signal. (Credit: Howard Milchberg)
An “air waveguide” has been used to enhance light signals collected from distant sources. A single waveguide could be used to send out a laser and collect a signal. (Credit: Howard Milchberg)
via theengineer

Hubble traces the halo of a galaxy more accurately than ever before

This image shows the stunning elliptical galaxy Centaurus A. Recently, astronomers have used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to probe the outskirts of this galaxy to learn more about its dim halo of stars. (Credit: ESA/Hubble)/NASA/Digitized Sky Survey/MPG/ESO
This image shows the stunning elliptical galaxy Centaurus A. Recently, astronomers have used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to probe the outskirts of this galaxy to learn more about its dim halo of stars. (Credit: ESA/Hubble)/NASA/Digitized Sky Survey/MPG/ESO
via astronomy

Proton spin mystery gains a new clue

Physicists long assumed a proton’s spin came from its three constituent quarks. New measurements suggest particles called gluons make a significant contribution (Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory)
via scientificamerican

‘Transformer’ pulsar is more than meets the eye

These artist's renderings show one model of pulsar J1023 before (top) and after (bottom) its radio beacon (green) vanished. Normally, the pulsar's wind staves off the companion's gas stream. When the stream surges, an accretion disk forms and gamma-ray particle jets (magenta) obscure the radio beam. NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
These artist’s renderings show one model of pulsar J1023 before (top) and after (bottom) its radio beacon (green) vanished. Normally, the pulsar’s wind staves off the companion’s gas stream. When the stream surges, an accretion disk forms and gamma-ray particle jets (magenta) obscure the radio beam.
(Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center)
via discovery

Massive neutrinos and new standard cosmological model: No concordance yet

 The research group demonstrates that adding such massive neutrinos to the standard model does not really explain all datasets. Credit: The Milky Way, NASA. Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-07-massive-neutrinos-standard-cosmological-concordance.html#jCp
The research group demonstrates that adding such massive neutrinos to the standard model does not really explain all datasets. (Credit: The Milky Way, NASA.)
via phys.org

What is gravity really (VIDEO)?

via nasa

Advanced dark matter experiment coming to SNOL

The Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search is an international, multimillion dollar dark matter experiment currently based in Minnesota with plans to progress the project by building a more sensitive detector at SNOLAB.
The Super Cryogenic Dark Matter Search is an international, multimillion dollar dark matter experiment currently based in Minnesota with plans to progress the project by building a more sensitive detector at SNOLAB. (Credit: SNOLAB)
via queensu

Update: Einstein is still full of surprises

What is the view of time that Albert Einstein presents to us in special relativity? Einstein tells us that there is no separate ‘time’ or ‘space.’ ‘Time’ and ‘space’ cannot be separated; they are a united whole.
What is the view of time that Albert Einstein presents to us in special relativity? Einstein tells us that there is no separate ‘time’ or ‘space.’ ‘Time’ and ‘space’ cannot be separated; they are a united whole.
via davidreneke