Physics in the News

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Researchers reveal why giant black hole’s ‘galactic fireworks’ were a flop(VIDEO)

via nature

Physicist George Ellis knocks physicists for knocking philosophy, falsification, and free will

"You cannot do physics or cosmology without an assumed philosophical basis," says George Ellis. (Credit: David Monniaux)
“You cannot do physics or cosmology without an assumed philosophical basis,” says George Ellis. (Credit: David Monniaux)

via scientificamerican

Boosting the force of empty space

Two atoms exchanging a virtual photon. Empty space around them is not as empty as one might think. (Credit: Vienna University of Technology, TU Vienna)
Two atoms exchanging a virtual photon. Empty space around them is not as empty as one might think. (Credit: Vienna University of Technology, TU Vienna)
via phys.org

Beyond energy, matter, time and space

New particles may yet be discovered, and even new laws. But it is almost taken for granted that everything from physics to biology, including the mind, ultimately comes down to four fundamental concepts: matter and energy interacting in an arena of space and time. (Credit: Carl Wiens)
New particles may yet be discovered, and even new laws. But it is almost taken for granted that everything from physics to biology, including the mind, ultimately comes down to four fundamental concepts: matter and energy interacting in an arena of space and time. (Credit: Carl Wiens)
via nytimes

‘Quantum Bounce’ theory claims black holes explode

Kepler's Supernova Remnant "On October 9, 1604, sky watchers -- including astronomer Johannes Kepler, spotted a "new star" in the western sky, rivaling the brilliance of nearby planets. "Kepler's supernova" was the last exploding supernova seen in our Milky Way galaxy. (Credit: NASA/ESA/JHU/R.Sankrit & W.Blair)
Kepler’s Supernova Remnant “On October 9, 1604, sky watchers — including astronomer Johannes Kepler, spotted a “new star” in the western sky, rivaling the brilliance of nearby planets. “Kepler’s supernova” was the last exploding supernova seen in our Milky Way galaxy. (Credit: NASA/ESA/JHU/R.Sankrit & W.Blair)
via nature

We only use 10% of our brains? That’s a myth

A Diffusion Spectrum MRI (DSI) of the human brain obtained with the MGH-UCLA Human ?Connectom? Scanner. The fiber tracks are color-coded by direction: red=left-right, green  =anterior-posterior, blue=through brain stem. (Credit: National Institutes of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering and National Institutes of Health)
A Diffusion Spectrum MRI (DSI) of the human brain obtained with the MGH-UCLA Human ‘Connectom’ Scanner. The fiber tracks are color-coded by direction:  red=left-right, green=anterior-posterior, blue=through brain stem. (Credit: National Institutes of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering and National Institutes of Health)
via theatlantic

Physics in the News

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Diversity in the Robot Reporter Newsroom

(Credit: The Verge)
The Associated Press recently announced a big new hire: A robot reporter from Automated Insights (AI) would be employed to write up to 4,400 earnings report stories per quarter. (Credit: The Verge)
via towcenter

Bee-Inspired bots skitter and swarm at NYC’s Museum of Mathematics

Credit: Rsorokanich
Credit: Rsorokanich
via gizmodo

Fear a terrifying killer robot revolution?

MIT's robot fingers get a grip. (Credit: Melanie Gonick/MIT)
MIT’s robot fingers get a grip. (Credit: Melanie Gonick/MIT)
via theregister

Can Our Minds Control Electronic Devices?

Brainwave electrodes for regenerative musical performance (Credit: BY-SA 3.0)
Brainwave electrodes for regenerative musical performance (Credit: BY-SA 3.0)
via theepochtimes

Does anyone outside Silicon Valley even want a smart watch?

In the past week, I’ve been called “Inspector Gadget” twice, had a near-calamitous accident involving spray-on sunblock, and felt my arm vibrate so often I started treating it as a phantom limb. (Credit: Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine)
In the past week, I’ve been called “Inspector Gadget” twice, had a near-calamitous accident involving spray-on sunblock, and felt my arm vibrate so often I started treating it as a phantom limb. (Credit: Photo: Bobby Doherty/New York Magazine)
via nymag

NASA Rover’s images show laser spark martian rock(VIDEO)

via sciencedaily

US Department of Energy funds new 5-year search for ‘dark light’

 US Department of Energy is funding Dr. Peter W. Graham research effort to the tune of $750,000.
US Department of Energy is funding Dr. Peter W. Graham research effort to the tune of $750,000.
via geek.com

Physics in the News

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Muscle powered Bio-bots walk on command(VIDEO)

via phys.org

‘Deep learning’ makes search for exotic particles easier

Simulation of a particle collision in which a Higgs boson is produced. (Credit: Lucas Taylor/CMS)
Simulation of a particle collision in which a Higgs boson is produced. (Credit: Lucas Taylor/CMS)
via phys.org

360 degree night sky time-lapse proves that Earth is beautiful

via mashable

Unknown Force May Alter Gravity at Cosmologically LargeScales

"The dark matter seems to 'know' how the visible matter is distributed. They seem to conspire with each other such that the gravity of the visible matter at the characteristic radius of the dark halo is always the same," said Dr. Benoit Famaey (Universities of Bonn and Strasbourg).
“The dark matter seems to ‘know’ how the visible matter is distributed. They seem to conspire with each other such that the gravity of the visible matter at the characteristic radius of the dark halo is always the same,” said Dr. Benoit Famaey (Universities of Bonn and Strasbourg).
via dailygalaxy

Would Earth look like a habitable planet from afar?

A zoomed-in image of Earth from the perspective of NASA’s Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS). The small dot below it is the moon. Credit: NASA Ames
A zoomed-in image of Earth from the perspective of NASA’s Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS). The small dot below it is the moon. Credit: NASA Ames
via phys.org

Near-Earth Asteroids key to Solar System’s earliest history

This chart illustrates how infrared is used to more accurately determine an asteroid’s size. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)
via forbes

Physics in the News

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Gravity is Driving Growth of the Universe

Astronomers Confirm from 600,000 Galaxies
Astronomers Confirm from 600,000 Galaxies

via dailygalaxy

 

The Grandfather Paradox

The "grandfather paradox": Time travel raises the spectrum of possibly changing life events. Photo: Universal Studios
The “grandfather paradox”: Time travel raises the spectrum of possibly changing life events. Photo: Universal Studios
via smh.com
 

NASA ‘flying saucer’ Success: A better way to land on Mars?

via theguardian

 

NASA’s Robot Astronaut Inspiring Tech Advances Here on Earth

Aboard the International Space Station, astronaut Karen Nyberg indulges in a moment of levity with Robonaut 2. Image tweeted on June 28, 2013.
Aboard the International Space Station, astronaut Karen Nyberg indulges in a moment of levity with Robonaut 2. Image tweeted on June 28, 2013.

via .space.com

 

The Most Mathematically Perfect Day of the Year

The Paley graph of order 9 is a perfect graph, making it an appropriate object of veneration and study on June 28, a perfect day. Image: David Eppstein. (Credit: Wikimedia)
The Paley graph of order 9 is a perfect graph, making it an appropriate object of veneration and study on June 28, a perfect day. Image: David Eppstein. (Credit: Wikimedia)
via scientificamerican
 

Delving into Dark Matter

Theory says there may be disk of it at center of galaxy. (Credit: Shutterstock)
Theory says there may be disk of it at center of galaxy.
via theepochtimes

Physics in the News

Thursday, June 19, 2014

This Shape-Shifter Could Tell Us Why Matter Exists

 An invisible neutrino entering a hydrogen bubble chamber from the right collides with a proton, leaving three visible particle pathways.
An invisible neutrino entering a hydrogen bubble chamber from the right collides with a proton, leaving three visible particle pathways.
via nautil.us

 

Gravity’s strength still an open question after latest measurement

Gravity field near earth at 1,2 and A the curvature of the Earth is negligible at this scale, and the gravity force lines can be approximated as being parallel and pointing straight down to the center of the Earth. (Credit: SA 3.0)

 

Field lines drawn for a point mass using 24 field lines The gravitational field can be represented using field lines. These run in the direction that a mass would be accelerated in initially. The object will not necessarily fall along the field lines, but the acceleration will always be in the direction of the field lines. The closer the field lines are together, the denser the gravitational field. (credit: CC BY-SA 3.0)
Field lines drawn for a point mass using 24 field lines. The gravitational field can be represented using field lines. These run in the direction that a mass would be accelerated in initially. The object will not necessarily fall along the field lines, but the acceleration will always be in the direction of the field lines. The closer the field lines are together, the denser the gravitational field.(credit: SA 3.0)

 

Will Venus Express Spacecraft Crash Or Keep Decoding Planet’s Secrets

This illustration of Venus Express shows it amid charged particles of solar wind in the upper layers of the Venusian atmosphere. (credit: ESA, AOES Medialab)
This illustration of Venus Express shows it amid charged particles of solar wind in the upper layers of the Venusian atmosphere. (Credit: ESA, AOES Medialab)
via nationalgeographic
 

NASA Dark-Energy Mission Could Spot 3,000 New Alien Planets

An artist's rendition of the proposed WFIRST-AFTA mission, which will study dark energy, extrasolar planets and objects in the near-infrared. (Credit: NASA)
An artist’s rendition of the proposed WFIRST-AFTA mission, which will study dark energy, extrasolar planets and objects in the near-infrared. (Credit: NASA)
via space.com

 

Universe’s Expansion Measured to Extreme Precision

An artist's view of how quasars and BOAs work together to measure the expansion of the universe. Light from distant quasars is absorbed by gas, which is imprinted with a pattern of BOAs from the early universe. Zosia Rostomian, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Andreu Font-Ribera, BOSS Lyman-alpha team, Berkeley Lab
An artist’s view of how quasars and BOAs work together to measure the expansion of the universe. Light from distant quasars is absorbed by gas, which is imprinted with a pattern of BOAs from the early universe. Zosia Rostomian, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and Andreu Font-Ribera, BOSS Lyman-alpha team, Berkeley Lab
via discovery.com

 

To test the effect of gravity on quantum entanglement, we need to go to space

May 4, 1935 New York Times article headline regarding the imminent EPR paper.
May 4, 1935 New York Times article headline regarding the imminent EPR paper.
via theconversation

 

Hubble Telescope loosens Kuiper belt to reveal ICY BODY for NASA boffins’ PROBE

The Kuiper belt is a region beyond Neptune that is full of comets, asteroids and other debris. It circles the solar system and has always been a little bit of a mystery as it is so far away and hard to explore.(Credit: Chris Dann)
The Kuiper belt is a region beyond Neptune that is full of comets, asteroids and other debris. It circles the solar system and has always been a little bit of a mystery as it is so far away and hard to explore.(Credit: Chris Dann)
via theregister