Physics in the News

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Cold dark matter may have kept our Milky Way all alone in its corner of the Universe

Two models of the dark matter distribution in the halo of a galaxy like the Milky Way, separated by the white line are shown. The colors represent the density of dark matter, with red indicating high-density and blue indicating low-density. On the left is a simulation of how non-interacting cold dark matter produces an abundance of smaller satellite galaxies. On the right the simulation shows the situation when the interaction of dark matter with other particles reduces the number of satellite galaxies we expect to observe around the Milky Way. (Credit: Durham University)
Two models of the dark matter distribution in the halo of a galaxy like the Milky Way, separated by the white line are shown. The colors represent the density of dark matter, with red indicating high-density and blue indicating low-density. On the left is a simulation of how non-interacting cold dark matter produces an abundance of smaller satellite galaxies. On the right the simulation shows the situation when the interaction of dark matter with other particles reduces the number of satellite galaxies we expect to observe around the Milky Way. (Credit: Durham University)
via forbes

Saturn Ring rapidly creates and destroys its moonlets

Cassini spied just as many regular, faint clumps in Saturn's narrow F ring (the outermost, thin ring), like those pictured here, as Voyager did. But it saw hardly any of the long, bright clumps that were common in Voyager images. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI)
Cassini spied just as many regular, faint clumps in Saturn’s narrow F ring (the outermost, thin ring), like those pictured here, as Voyager did. But it saw hardly any of the long, bright clumps that were common in Voyager images. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI)
via discovery

‘Solid’ light could compute previously unsolvable problems

Oscillations of photons create an image of frozen light. At first, photons in the experiment flow easily between two superconducting sites, producing the large waves shown at left. After a time, the scientists cause the light to "freeze," trapping the photons in place. Fast oscillations on the right of the image are evidence of the new trapped behavior. (Credit: Princeton University)
Oscillations of photons create an image of frozen light. At first, photons in the experiment flow easily between two superconducting sites, producing the large waves shown at left. After a time, the scientists cause the light to “freeze,” trapping the photons in place. Fast oscillations on the right of the image are evidence of the new trapped behavior. (Credit: Princeton University)
via phys.org

Squeezed quantum communication

 Erlangen-based physicists have sent bright pulses in sensitive quantum states through the window of a technical services room on the roof of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light to a building of the University Erlangen-Nürnberg. These types of light flashes are easy to receive even when the sun is shining brightly, unlike the signals of individual photons used to date. (Credit: MPI for the Science of Light)

Erlangen-based physicists have sent bright pulses in sensitive quantum states through the window of a technical services room on the roof of the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light to a building of the University Erlangen-Nürnberg. These types of light flashes are easy to receive even when the sun is shining brightly, unlike the signals of individual photons used to date. (Credit: MPI for the Science of Light)
via sciencecodex

Holography entangles quantum physics with gravity

The gravity of a black hole swallows the matter around it. The link between tensor networks and quantum entanglement may prove useful in studying the physics of black holes, some physicists propose. (Credit: )
The gravity of a black hole swallows the matter around it. The link between tensor networks and quantum entanglement may prove useful in studying the physics of black holes, some physicists propose. (Credit: M. Weiss, Chandra X -ray Center/NASA)
via sciencenews

Scientists at Harvard crush, freeze and light their ‘soft’ robot on fire and it still wriggles away

via rdmag

Buckyballs, diamonds inspire new synthetic molecule

Square, cage-shaped molecules called diamondoids (left) linked to soccer-ball shaped buckyballs (right) create a new molecule called a buckydiamondoid, center, in this illustration. These new hybrid molecules may be useful for developing molecular electronic devices in the future.
Square, cage-shaped molecules called diamondoids (left) linked to soccer-ball shaped buckyballs (right) create a new molecule called a buckydiamondoid, center, in this illustration. These new hybrid molecules may be useful for developing molecular electronic devices in the future. (Credit: Manoharan Lab/Stanford University)
via sciencenews

This animation perfectly explains gravitational lensing

via geek

Artificial cells created that change shape and move on their own

via singularityhub

When machines outsmart humans

 Machines have surpassed humans in physical strength, speed and stamina. What if they surpassed human intellect as well? Science fiction movies have explored this question. In the classic "2001: A Space Odyssey," astronaut David Bowman, played by Keir Dullea, struggles for control of the spacecraft against the sentient computer HAL 9000.
Machines have surpassed humans in physical strength, speed and stamina. What if they surpassed human intellect as well? Science fiction movies have explored this question. In the classic “2001: A Space Odyssey,” astronaut David Bowman, played by Keir Dullea, struggles for control of the spacecraft against the sentient computer HAL 9000.
via cnn

Physics in the News

Monday, August 4, 2014

Elon Musk calls Artificial Intelligence ‘potentially more dangerous than nukes’

Above: Tesla CEO Elon Musk. (Credit: SXSW Livestream)
Tesla CEO Elon Musk. (Credit: SXSW Livestream)
via businessinsider

NASA wants to build gas stations in space

NASA hopes to add precious years of functional life to satellites and expand options for operators who face unexpected emergencies, tougher economic demand and aging fleets. (Credit: Bob Granath, Kt-Imaging)
NASA hopes to add precious years of functional life to satellites and expand options for operators who face unexpected emergencies, tougher economic demand and aging fleets. (Credit: Bob Granath, Kt-Imaging)
via technobuffalo

Milky Way galaxy is just half as massive as Andromeda

Andromeda is twice as massive as the Milky Way. Scientists say that Andromeda has twice the mass, made of dark matter, than the Milky Way. (Credit: Phil Plait)
Andromeda is twice as massive as the Milky Way. Scientists say that Andromeda has twice the mass, made of dark matter, than the Milky Way.
(Credit: Phil Plait)
via techtimes

New rule restricting foreign instruments on NASA space probes stirs debate

(Credit: NASA)
(Credit: NASA)
via examiner

General Relativity – Embedding light at the heart of cosmology

Einstein was the first person to propose that ‘empty space’, which does not contain matter or radiation, is not actually empty and in fact has a residual energy.  This empty space is also capable of creating more space from itself. (Credit: benmoat/Shutterstock)
Einstein was the first person to propose that ‘empty space’, which does not contain matter or radiation, is not actually empty and in fact has a residual energy. This empty space is also capable of creating more space from itself. (Credit: benmoat/Shutterstock)
via azooptics

Tiny flying robots are being built to pollinate crops instead of real bees

The RoboBee demonstrates a successful flight next to a quarter for scale. (Credit: Harvard University)
The RoboBee demonstrates a successful flight next to a quarter for scale. (Credit: Harvard University)
 via iphoneeinstein

Europe’s Rosetta probe reaches climax of its comet-chasing mission

The Rosetta spacecraft is scheduled to rendezvous with Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on Wednesday. If all goes according to plan, Rosetta will become the first probe ever to orbit a comet — and, in November, the first to drop a lander onto the surface of one of these icy wanderers. (Credit: ESA)
The Rosetta spacecraft is scheduled to rendezvous with Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on Wednesday. If all goes according to plan, Rosetta will become the first probe ever to orbit a comet — and, in November, the first to drop a lander onto the surface of one of these icy wanderers. (Credit: ESA)

via nbcnews

 Absence of Russia instrument onboard NASA Mars Rover not related to politics 

Photo of the Mars surface, Made with HiRise Camera. (Credit: NASA JPL/University of Arizona)
Photo of the Mars surface, Made with HiRise Camera. (Credit: NASA JPL/University of Arizona)
via ria

The holographic augmented reality future has arrived (Again)

via physicsworld