Physics in the News

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

NuSTAR telescope discovers shockingly bright dead star

Astronomers have found a pulsating dead star beaming with the energy of about 10 million Suns, which is the brightest pulsar ever recorded..  A rare and mighty pulsar (pink) can be seen at the center of galaxy M82 in this new multi-wavelength portrait. NASA's NuSTAR mission discovered the "pulse" of the pulsar — a type of dead star — using is high-energy X-ray vision.
Astronomers have found a pulsating dead star beaming with the energy of about 10 million Suns, which is the brightest pulsar ever recorded.. A rare and mighty pulsar (pink) can be seen at the center of galaxy M82 in this new multi-wavelength portrait. NASA’s NuSTAR mission discovered the “pulse” of the pulsar — a type of dead star — using is high-energy X-ray vision.
via astronomy

Hypothetical new cosmological model known as Higgsogenesis (PDF)

The term Higgsogenesis refers to the first appearance of Higgs particles in the early universe, just as baryogenesis refers to the appearance of baryons (protons and neutrons) in the early moments after the big bang. While baryogenesis is a fairly well understood process, Higgsogenesis is still very hypothetical. (Credit: CERN/Lucas Taylor, Koberlein)
The term Higgsogenesis refers to the first appearance of Higgs particles in the early universe, just as baryogenesis refers to the appearance of baryons (protons and neutrons) in the early moments after the big bang. While baryogenesis is a fairly well understood process, Higgsogenesis is still very hypothetical. (Credit: CERN/Lucas Taylor, Koberlein)
via phys.org

Dark matter half what we thought, say scientists (PDF)

A new measurement of dark matter in the Milky Way has revealed there is half as much of the mysterious substance as previously thought.  The above is an artist's impression of the Milky Way and its dark matter halo (shown in blue, but in reality invisible). Credit: ESO/L. Calçada
A new measurement of dark matter in the Milky Way has revealed there is half as much of the mysterious substance as previously thought. The above is an artist’s impression of the Milky Way and its dark matter halo (shown in blue, but in reality invisible). (Credit: ESO/L. Calçada)
via sciencedaily

Astronomers see right into heart of exploding star

 (Credit: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF)
An international team of astronomers has been able to see into the heart of an exploding star, by combining data from telescopes that are hundreds or even thousands of kilometres apart. (Credit: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF)
via manchester

Among the artian hills: Curiosity Rover peers at rocks of Mount Sharp

After a couple of years of racing towards Mount Sharp (Aeolis Mons), now it’s time for the Curiosity rover to get a better look at its Martian surroundings. Rover tracks and Martian sand as seen from the rear hazcam of NASA’s Curiosity rover. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)
After a couple of years of racing towards Mount Sharp (Aeolis Mons), now it’s time for the Curiosity rover to get a better look at its Martian surroundings. Rover tracks and Martian sand as seen from the rear hazcam of NASA’s Curiosity rover. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)
via universetoday

Two new strange and charming particles appear at LHC

Two new particles have been discovered by the LHCb experiment at CERN's Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, Switzerland. One of them has a combination of properties that has never been observed before. : Dave Stock)
Two new particles have been discovered by the LHCb experiment at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, Switzerland. One of them has a combination of properties that has never been observed before. (Credit: Dave Stock)
via newscientist

 The cosmic signal that might have changed human civilization

The image above shows a graphic which was produced by the SETI from the data of the Wow signal. A signal (Gaussian, triplet or pulse) arises only in a single narrowband channel. All other channels contain noise. Up to now we do not know cosmic phenomena which would generate such signals. It would seem improbable that they have no artificial origin. The picture shows a computer generated example of a strong Gaussian signal.
The image above shows a graphic which was produced by the SETI from the data of the Wow signal. A signal (Gaussian, triplet or pulse) arises only in a single narrowband channel. All other channels contain noise. Up to now we do not know cosmic phenomena which would generate such signals. It would seem improbable that they have no artificial origin. The picture shows a computer generated example of a strong Gaussian signal.
via dailygalaxy

World’s longest neutrino beam will explore why the universe still exists

This quirk of subatomics could have huge implications for our understanding of the universe, specifically how the current inequality between matter and antimatter came to be. Answering that could, in turn, provide a better insight as to why reality did not simply blink out of existence immediately after the Big Bang as a universe's worth of matter and antimatter negated one another's existences (
This quirk of subatomics could have huge implications for our understanding of the universe, specifically how the current inequality between matter and antimatter came to be. Answering that could, in turn, provide a better insight as to why reality did not simply blink out of existence immediately after the Big Bang as a universe’s worth of matter and antimatter negated one another’s existences (Credit: Tarantola, Fermilab, )
via gizmodo

What a difference a  neutron makes

For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that modified hydrogen bonding is sufficient to switch solid-state electronic properties. (Credit: University of Tokyo. ,Tan)
For the first time, scientists have demonstrated that modified hydrogen bonding is sufficient to switch solid-state electronic properties. (Credit: University of Tokyo. ,Tan)
via asianscientist

 

Physics in the News

Wednesday, October 8, 2014

UW fusion reactor concept could be cheaper than coal

The UW’s current fusion experiment, HIT-SI3. It is about one-tenth the size of the power-producing dynomak concept. (Credit: U of Washington)
The UW’s current fusion experiment, HIT-SI3. It is about one-tenth the size of the power-producing dynomak concept. (Credit: U of Washington)
via washington.edu

Researchers achieve quantum teleporting

via azoquantum

Tipping the spherical cow: The initial conditions of star formation

Gas column density 5 Myr after stars begin forming in the “real” Clouds (left panels) and corresponding Spheres (right panels). The Spheres begin forming stars 5-6 Myr after t=0, so the figure shows simulations at a similar stage of star formation. Clouds show more widespread star formation, and alignment of their major gas filaments along the larger-scale structures present in the galaxy. Part of Figure 2 from Rey-Raposo, Dobbs & Duarte-Cabral 2014.
Gas column density 5 Myr after stars begin forming in the “real” Clouds (left panels) and corresponding Spheres (right panels). The Spheres begin forming stars 5-6 Myr after t=0, so the figure shows simulations at a similar stage of star formation. Clouds show more widespread star formation, and alignment of their major gas filaments along the larger-scale structures present in the galaxy. (Credit: Rey-Raposo, Dobbs & Duarte-Cabral 2014)
via astrobites

Breakthrough allows researchers to watch molecules “wiggle”

Difference electron density maps showing the comparison of control and HATRX data for thaumatin. (Credit: University of Leeds)
via rdmag

Monster galaxies resort to cannibalism to keep growing

Larger galaxies are unable to create new stars at a rapid enough pace so they start to “eat” stars in neighboring galaxies. (Photo By Nasa/Getty Images)
Larger galaxies are unable to create new stars at a rapid enough pace so they start to “eat” stars in neighboring galaxies. (Photo By Nasa/Getty Images)
via cbs

Aliens may be too distant for contact

The SETI Institute's Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is hunting for radio signals from hypothetical intelligent alien life in our galaxy. (Credit: SETI) Institute
The SETI Institute’s Allen Telescope Array (ATA) is hunting for radio signals from hypothetical intelligent alien life in our galaxy. (Credit: SETI) Institute
via aninews

How NASA plans to utilize lasers in order to draw 3D maps of the earth’s forests

NASA has a new project underway called GEDI. The sole purpose of GEDI is to point a laser-based device at Earth from the International Space Station in order to map out forests in 3D, eventually determining the amount of carbon in Earth’s forests. (Credit: NASA's Goddard Space)
NASA has a new project underway called GEDI. The sole purpose of GEDI is to point a laser-based device at Earth from the International Space Station in order to map out forests in 3D, eventually determining the amount of carbon in Earth’s forests. (Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space)
via industrytap

Sierra Nevada protest halts production of SpaceX and Boeing space taxis

 The Wait For Space A look through the open hatch of SpaceX's Dragon V2 capsule, one of two designs chosen for NASA's Commercial Crew Transportation Capability program. Both Boeing and SpaceX have been told to halt production of their space taxi designs until a protest filed by the Sierra Nevada Corporation has been resolved. (Credit: NASA)
A look through the open hatch of SpaceX’s Dragon V2 capsule, one of two designs chosen for NASA’s Commercial Crew Transportation Capability program. Both Boeing and SpaceX have been told to halt production of their space taxi designs until a protest filed by the Sierra Nevada Corporation has been resolved. (Credit: NASA)
via popsci

Three win Nobel for super-zoom microscopes

German winner of the Nobel Prize for chemistry Stefan Hell gestures at a small party with his colleagues in Goettingen, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014. Hell shares the prize with Americans Eric Betzig and William E. Moerner for developing ways to dramatically improve the resolution of optical microscopes. Hell developed the underlying technology for R&D 100 Awards-winning super-resolution microscopes from Leica. (Credit AP/dpa, Swen Pfoertner)
German winner of the Nobel Prize for chemistry Stefan Hell gestures at a small party with his colleagues in Goettingen, Germany, Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014. Hell shares the prize with Americans Eric Betzig and William E. Moerner for developing ways to dramatically improve the resolution of optical microscopes. Hell developed the underlying technology for R&D 100 Awards-winning super-resolution microscopes from Leica. (Credit AP/dpa, Swen Pfoertner)
via rdmag

Newly discovered letter gives a rare glimpse into Einstein’s personal views on life

he Einstein Papers Project, a group of scholars devoted to collecting and transcribing Einstein’s works and publishing The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein both online and in printed format, have collected thousands of Einstein’s letters, both those from him and to him. But this exchange is new. (Credit: The Telegraph)
The Einstein Papers Project, a group of scholars devoted to collecting and transcribing Einstein’s works and publishing The Collected Papers of Albert Einstein both online and in printed format, have collected thousands of Einstein’s letters, both those from him and to him. But this exchange is new. (Credit: The Telegraph)
via inquisitr

Physics in the News

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

Invention of blue LEDs receives physics Nobel

via bbc

Blood Moon total lunar eclipse coming up

via knoxnews

New mechanism of photoconduction could lead to next-generation excitonic devices

Shown here is the crystal structure of molybdenite, MoS2. When hit with a burst of laser light, freed electrons and holes combine to form combinations called trions, consisting of two electrons and one hole (represented here by orange and green balls). (Credit: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT)
Shown here is the crystal structure of molybdenite, MoS2. When hit with a burst of laser light, freed electrons and holes combine to form combinations called trions, consisting of two electrons and one hole, represented here by orange and green balls. (Credit: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT)
via mit

A huge new neutrino experiment is up and running at Fermilab

 Construction of Noνa, apparently the biggest free-standing plastic structure in the world. And a neutrino detector. Photograph: FNAL
Construction of Noνa, apparently the biggest free-standing plastic structure in the world. And a neutrino detector. (Credit: FNAL)
via theguardian

NASA’s Orion capsule floats inside US Navy ship

A test version of NASA's Orion capsule floats in the rear of the USS Anchorage during a recovery drill off the coast of California September 15, 2014. Orion is NASA's next exploration spacecraft, designed to carry astronauts to destinations in deep space, including an asteroid and Mars. Picture taken September 15, 2014.  (Credit: REUTERS/Mike Blake)
A test version of NASA’s Orion capsule floats in the rear of the USS Anchorage during a recovery drill off the coast of California September 15, 2014. Orion is NASA’s next exploration spacecraft, designed to carry astronauts to destinations in deep space, including an asteroid and Mars. Picture taken September 15, 2014. (Credit: REUTERS/Mike Blake)
via reuters

How big data is fueling a new age in space exploration

A few major factors will drive exponential growth in the amount of terabytes falling on us from the skies over the next couple of decades: the increasing speed of commercial satellite deployment, implementation of faster communication technology, and the onset of interplanetary missions. (Credit: SKA Telescope, Golubovich)
A few major factors will drive exponential growth in the amount of terabytes falling on us from the skies over the next couple of decades: the increasing speed of commercial satellite deployment, implementation of faster communication technology, and the onset of interplanetary missions. (Credit: SKA Telescope, Golubovich)
via venturebeat

The difficulty of using the Doppler shift to measure the wobble of a star

One of the biggest advances of astronomy in the past decade has been the discovery of planets orbiting other stars, known as exoplanets. But just how many exoplanets have been discovered? According to the Extrasolar Planet Encyclopedia, a semi-official catalog based in Europe, there were as of the end of September last year 990 confirmed exoplanets and 2,321 candidate exoplanets. (Credit: Zina Deretsky, National Science Foundation)
How many exoplanets have been discovered? According to the Extrasolar Planet Encyclopedia, a semi-official catalog based in Europe, there were as of the end of September last year 990 confirmed exoplanets and 2,321 candidate exoplanets. (Credit: Zina Deretsky, National Science Foundation)
via phys.org

Pressing the accelerator on quantum robotics

The theoretical work has focused on using quantum computing to accelerate the machine learning. (Credit: SINC)
The theoretical work has focused on using quantum computing to accelerate the machine learning. (Credit: SINC)
via sciencedaily

How much should a robot be allowed to hurt its coworkers?

, a collaborative robot from Rethink Robotics, works on a mocked-up assembly line. (Credit: Rethink Robotics)
A collaborative robot from Rethink Robotics, works on a mocked-up assembly line. Setting limits on the level of pain a robot may (accidentally) inflict on a human is a crucial goal of the first safety standards being drawn up for these “collaborative” robots. (Credit: Rethink Robotics, Simonite)
via technologyreview

Why ‘Frankenstein’ Robots Could Be the Future of Artificial Intelligence

via motherboard

Why didn’t they win? 10 huge discoveries without a Nobel Prize

Thomas Edison is famous for his lightbulb, but he never won a Nobel Prize. (Credit:  AFP/Getty)
Thomas Edison is famous for his lightbulb, but he never won a Nobel Prize. (Credit: AFP/Getty)
via nationalgeographic

Physics in the News

Monday, October 6, 2014

Princeton scientists observe elusive particle that behaves both like Matter and Antimatter discovered

via princeton

Turn your smart phone into a cosmic ray telescope

Professor Justin Vandenbroucke leads the development of the DECO app. (Credit: Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)
Professor Justin Vandenbroucke leads the development of the DECO app. (Credit: Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)
via wisc.edu

Physicists succeed in compressing quantum data for the first time

if we have a system of qubits all in the same state (with the same probability distributions), we have identical qubits, even though we might get different results upon measuring the individual qubits. Strangely enough, particles in the quantum world can be both identical and distinct at the same time.  (Credit: M. Byrne)
if we have a system of qubits all in the same state (with the same probability distributions), we have identical qubits, even though we might get different results upon measuring the individual qubits. Strangely enough, particles in the quantum world can be both identical and distinct at the same time. (Credit: M. Byrne)

via motherboard

Composite image shows two black holes orbiting each other

his composite X-ray/radio image of Abell 400 shows radio jets (pink), immersed in a vast cloud of multimillion degree X-ray emitting gas (blue) that pervades the cluster. The jets emanate from the vicinity of two supermassive black holes (bright spots in the image) in the galaxy. Chandra and radio data confirm that the unusual structure is due to the merger of two large galaxies, whose supermassive black holes are bound together by their mutual gravity. The swept-back appearance of the radio jets is produced by the rapid motion of the galaxy through the hot gas of the cluster, in much the same way that a motorcyclist's scarf is swept back while speeding down the road.Credit: X-Ray: NASA/CXC/D. Hudson, T.Reiprich et al. (AIfA); Radio: NRAO/VLA/ NRL
This composite X-ray/radio image of Abell 400 shows radio jets (pink), immersed in a vast cloud of multimillion degree X-ray emitting gas (blue) that pervades the cluster. The jets emanate from the vicinity of two supermassive black holes (bright spots in the image) in the galaxy. Chandra and radio data confirm that the unusual structure is due to the merger of two large galaxies, whose supermassive black holes are bound together by their mutual gravity. (Credit: X-Ray: NASA/CXC/D. Hudson, T.Reiprich et al. (AIfA); Radio: NRAO/VLA/ NRL)
via phys

NASA to put astronauts in deep sleep (therapeutic torpor) for Mars mission

via discovery

Jet activity at the neck of the Rosetta comet

rosettacomet
a region of jet activity can be seen at the neck of the comet. These jets, originating from several discrete locations, are a product of ices sublimating and gases escaping from inside the nucleus. (Credit: ESA, NASA)
via phys.org

Pluto the “Unexplored Planet” Is it a Planet? Could it have astrobiological potential?

via dailygalaxy

Rat brains enlisted in quest for spatial certainty

Researcher will mash together the visual recognition skills of humans and the spatial memory system of rats to enable robots to navigate in any environmental conditions. (Credit: The Australian)
Researcher will mash together the visual recognition skills of humans and the spatial memory system of rats to enable robots to navigate in any environmental conditions. (Credit: The Australian)
via theaustralian

Tiny fossil galaxies of first stars of the Universe found orbiting Milky Way

The image above shows a standard prediction for the dark matter distribution within about 1 million light years of the Milky Way galaxy, which is expected to be swarming with thousands of small dark matter clumps called `halos'. (Credit: Garrison, Kimmel, Bullock, UCI)
The image above shows a standard prediction for the dark matter distribution within about 1 million light years of the Milky Way galaxy, which is expected to be swarming with thousands of small dark matter clumps called `halos’. (Credit: Garrison, Kimmel, Bullock, UCI)
via dailygalaxy

Is the next supercollider a good investment?

cern-030308
There is no doubt in my mind that society invests its billions well if it invests in theoretical physics. Whether that investment should go into particle colliders though is a different question. I don’t have a good answer to that, and I don’t see that the question is seriously being discussed. (Credit: Hossenfelder)
via backreaction

Physics in the News

Friday, September 26, 2014

New molecule found in space connotes life origins

The vibrant, starry stream of the Milky Way frames radio telescopes of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array - known as the ALMA Observatory - in Chile’s Atacama Desert. (Credit: Y. Beletsky/ESO)
The vibrant, starry stream of the Milky Way frames radio telescopes of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array – known as the ALMA Observatory – in Chile’s Atacama Desert. (Credit: Y. Beletsky/ESO)
via cornell

Black holes declared non-existent again.

Two international teams of astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope and ground-based telescopes in Australia and Chile have discovered the first examples of isolated stellar-mass black holes adrift among the stars in our galaxy. (Credit: NASA/ESA, D. Bennett)
via backreaction

First Quantum Logic Operation For An Integrated Photonic Chip

The first teleportation of a photon inside a photonic chip illustrates both the potential for quantum computation and the significant challenges that lay ahead.
The first teleportation of a photon inside a photonic chip illustrates both the potential for quantum computation and the significant challenges that lay ahead.
via technologyreview

Cold Atom Laboratory Chills Atoms to New Lows

rtist's concept of an atom chip for use by NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) aboard the International Space Station. CAL will use lasers to cool atoms to ultracold temperatures. (Credit: NASA)
rtist’s concept of an atom chip for use by NASA’s Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) aboard the International Space Station. CAL will use lasers to cool atoms to ultracold temperatures. (Credit: NASA)
via jpl

A dramatic recent “discovery” in physics is looking rather dodgy

 A paper just released by the team behind Planck, a European space telescope, casts serious doubt on the BICEP-2 result. (Credit: D. Simonds)
A paper just released by the team behind Planck, a European space telescope, casts serious doubt on the BICEP-2 result. (Credit: D. Simonds)
via economist

Craig Nelson claims that the atomic era is in its twilight years

"The atomic age is an incredible epoch, filled with people we think we know already—from Marie Curie and Albert Einstein to Ronald Reagan and the plant workers of Fukushima—but they all turn out to be a lot more complicated and interesting than any of us could’ve imagined," says Nelson.(Credit: Helvio Faria)
“The atomic age is an incredible epoch, filled with people we think we know already—from Marie Curie and Albert Einstein to Ronald Reagan and the plant workers of Fukushima—but they all turn out to be a lot more complicated and interesting than any of us could’ve imagined,” says Nelson. (Credit: Helvio Faria)
via scitation